Weight Gain in Pregnancy

WEIGHT GAIN IN PREGNANCY

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Having a healthy baby with a normal birth rate
is directly linked to pre-pregnancy weight.

 

Even if you are 20 or more pounds over-weight you would still need to gain weight during your pregnancy.

Many women know little about the importance of weight gain in pregnancy, or are given too low of a weight amount. Not gaining enough weight puts your baby at risk for infant low birth weight or fetal death.

Women who gain less than 20 pounds during pregnancy are at the highest risk. The best fetal outcome is when a woman gains twenty-six to thirty-five pounds during their pregnancy.

A woman who is overweight at conception, may need to go up to 40 pounds in weight gain. Her calorie intake was already higher when she conceived. She needs to consider the needs of the unborn fetus inside of her.


DO NOT DIET DURING YOUR PREGNANCY!

 

Under-eating during the last portion of the pregnancy puts the fetus at risk for underdevelopment of the brain, and abnormal growth.

• Don’t worry about your weight gain.
• Eat when your appetite tells you to eat.
• But…when you eat, eat with good nutrition in mind. No “empty calories”, …ever.
• Don’t restrict salt intake
• Be careful with drugs, especially diuretics.

During pregnancy the blood volume of the circulatory system increases more than 40 percent in order to take care of the needs of the mother and baby. The expansion of blood is determined and is maintained by whether or not there is adequate salt intake. This includes salt that is found in the foods you eat, as well as that which is used to flavor the food.

Be sure to refer to the “Baby Wise Diet” blog post or hand-out when choosing foods. Eat fresh whole foods as often as possible. Try to limit the “sweets” from your diet such as cakes, pies, cookies, and candy. Also limit fast foods and fried foods.


Concentrate on:

Fruits, vegetables, whole grain cereals and breads, fish (see nutrition hand-outs for cautions), poultry and lean meats.

Dairy products are also important, if tolerated, but remember calcium and other nutrients can be found in dark leafy vegetables as well.

Yogurt can be and is a good source of protein and calcium, but also is good for the intestinal tract. It is better tolerated than whole milk because of the fermentation processed used to culture the yogurt. With the over-use of antibiotics, our intestinal flora cannot support the production of essential vitamins normally found within the intestinal tract.

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