Issues Part 2

The issues that affect Lakota Native women during pregnancy and childbirth in regards to: Racism, Sexism, and Oppression – Part 2

With new contact with the European settlers, many natives also had died due to the diseases that came with the settlers. Millions of indigenous people died by disease they had no immunity in which to fight. Disease, along with the losses of lives through conflicts or being starved out, diminished the populous and allowed for further settlement.

Over time, some philosophical concepts arose that was thought to garner the concept of a congealed wholeness of this new settler society, such as the melting pot concept. It would never become fully congealed due to its not dealing with non-whites within the American culture, i.e. how do non-whites fit the ideal? Such as, black slaves or native people.

A second concept, cultural pluralism, was a belief where many cultures and communities “should be tolerated” and somehow would all fit under the umbrella of a somewhat fused society and therefore be protected. Cultural pluralism also did not work.

Instead, the concept of assimilation grew, that would cause all groups to conform to one single group, the now dominant white/Anglo-protestant group. “Gordon (1964) has called Anglo-conformity. The idea was that the various cultural groups were to completely shed the individual unique qualities they possessed with expedience and take on the dominant cultural ways”.

So when tribes began conforming to cultural / religious ideology of the settlers, they believed this could preserve their people. The south-eastern tribes learned this philosophy of assimilating to the dominant culture had no lasting value. They became victim to American policies of removal (the American Indian Removal Act of 1830 ), in order that the American people could take the lands upon which they lived.

Policies of American government continued to diminish the lands and societies of the native populous as the immigrants continued to pour into the new “United states”. In time, the political policy was to remove children from their family and culture, carting them off to boarding schools to forcibly assimilate the populace of the younger generation of native people to “Kill the Indian in him, and save the man ”.

Traditional Childbirth Practices

In Lakota native societies (as was true of many tribal groups), the extended family groups (Tiospayes, as it is called in Lakota society) each had their own midwives that lived within the family group, and healers that worked with women. This was attested by two interviewees whose grandmothers were practicing midwives.

The teachings of the elder women within the culture (regarding traditional childbirth practices) would have been transferred from elder female to a younger generation of females. But, over time, the use of midwives within the communities had dwindled as the older females died. In interviewing people the trail of lost information seems to have run out in the generation just previous to my own, in most communities.

The shift from the traditional mode to what we now see is due to the dominant culture forcibly removing any access to information about traditional practices through assimilation policies (i.e. Boarding Schools) and over time, access to midwives and healers through government funded hospitals (I.H.S.) policies. The final act of forced assimilation was to remove the right to spiritual practices and native medicine from the arena of health care, forcing tribal members to rely on doctors from the dominant white society.

See next week’s Part 3 – The issues that affect Lakota Native women during pregnancy and childbirth in regards to: Racism, Sexism, and Oppression?

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