Issues Part 3

What are the issues that affect Lakota Native women during pregnancy and childbirth in regards to: Racism, Sexism, and Oppression – Part 3

After years of encroachment upon traditional healing practices, the stage was set for an Eugenics movement. This movement “… in the 20th century began as a means of controlling the perceived increase in ‘degenerate’ population and maintaining or protecting hereditarily ‘fit’ members in society from being overrun by the genetically ‘unfit.’ (Forbes, 2)” or groups that were marginalized, such as Native Americans.

Initially, the population targeted was those with low intelligence and those with physical disabilities. But, soon it expanded to “ a program to implement ‘racial hygiene’ in the United States, eugenics essentially entailed taking the principle of natural selection and enforcing it by employing allegedly ‘scientific’ means (Forbes, 2)” The concern was that the white populace were being degraded by the influx of people with racial differences. The classifications included socio-economic, class, status and race.

…policies founded on eugenic theories (sic) started to emerge, forcing procedural sterilizations and other means of population control upon people believed to be unfit (Forbes, 2-3)”. In the late 60s and through the 70s the target was Native American people. Indian Health Services began a systematic sterilization policy.

Women would go to the I.H.S. hospital, told they needed a cesarean section (for a variety of reasons), anesthetized; and when they awoke, these women found they had been given a hysterectomy, which is what happened to my friend. She stated that she was not informed of the need for a hysterectomy. She had gone to deliver her baby, the doctors examined her and stated that she needed an emergency cesarean section. She awoke, finding that she had her uterus removed. My friend’s experience was not uncommon, “…in 1975 alone, some 25,000 Native American women were permanently sterilized – many after being coerced, misinformed, or threatened .

In 1990, a former nurse at I.H.S. reported that tubal ligations were used on women who did not want the surgical procedure. Birth control also was forced upon unsuspecting females such as Depo-Provera, without informed consent, and prior to the FDA having given its approval (this would include the mentally retarded ).

Health risks of the drug Depo-Provera are high in native populations due to Diabetes, obesity, and cigarette smoking. Many who were forced to have it or Norplant administered were not informed of the risk. A secondary aspect is the cultural issues. Irregular bleeding that is caused by these drugs can prevented participation in traditional spiritual practices.

In my own research of the issues of native women in the child-bearing years I was shocked by the high numbers of cesarean sections done on this sector of women. The rate of C-Sections nation-wide is 32.8%; whereas South Dakota is around 25.3%. But, I.H.S. rates are higher than the state average, last internet search showed it at 34%.

Why is this of concern? The health risks of women in the child-bearing years due to unnecessary surgery being conducted. Childbirth is treated by the modern medical doctors as though the baby a ‘disease’ that needs to be cut-out, rather than a natural biological reproductive process. Had the traditional practices of midwifery had been continued within the native culture, allowed to flourish, there would have been very few cesarean sections necessary in our modern times.

Other Factors Regarding Childbirth in Indian Country

Next below the black woman, the native woman is recorded as 2nd to the highest in infant mortality rates . This is due to living in rural areas with poor access to proper care during pregnancy. “Poverty is an important risk factor for poor health outcomes ”.

Compounding the issues mentioned above are those of teen and pre-teen births. A female who is younger than 18 or 19 years of age are not fully developed, in other words are still growing themselves. Teenagers tend to eat poorly, are more prone to drink alcohol, smoke, and take drugs during pregnancy.

Next: What are the issues that affect Lakota Native women during pregnancy and childbirth in regards to: Racism, Sexism, and Oppression – Part 4

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