Another Recipe

The image is of a black bean, corn, and squash recipe.  If you would like to try it, follow the link under the image…

3-sisters-soup
Image from The Taste Space: 3 Sisters Soup

Three Sisters Soup

(Bean, Corn and Squash Soup)

1 tbsp oil (preferably not crisco)
1 yellow onion, diced
1 red or orange bell pepper, diced
2 cups diced kabocha squash, butternut squash (or a peeled winter squash of your choice)
12 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
5-6 cups of vegetable stock or water
salt, to taste
2 cups corn (I used frozen roasted corn, you can also roast corn on the cob and then cut the corn)
2 cups cooked green beans, rinsed and drained if canned or tips pinched off and then snapped into bite-sized lengths

Optional: red bell pepper, and other spices for flavoring.

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. In a large soup pot over medium-high heat, heat oil. Once hot, add onions and cook, stirring continuously, until softened, around 2 minutes. Sprinkle with salt. Add bell pepper and cook until they begin to soften, another 2 minutes. Add squash and garlic and stir well. Decrease the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft and fragrant, around 10 minutes.
  2. Add the water, salt.  Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Add corn and green beans and return to a boil. Once boiling, decrease heat to medium-low, partially cover and simmer until all the vegetables are cooked through, approximately 10-20 minutes. Remove from the heat. Adjust seasoning to taste. Top with additional hot sauce/sriracha, if desired.

Serves 4.

NOTE: the original “bean” from the “3 Sister’s” is a pole or runner bean, commonly known as the green bean.

From: https://tastespace.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/three-sisters-soup-black-bean-corn-and-squash-soup/

The Plains Paleo Diet for Pregnancy

 

buffalo

Introduction

A Plains native diet could actually be called “biso-vegetarian”, or something similar. Just consider this, the people were huntergatherers. They gathered wild fruits, nuts, and vegetables off the land for eating and hunted small game and bison or buffalo.

The meats eaten were Buffalo, elk, deer, fish, turtle (on rare occasions), and birds to name a few.  The diet of that time was high in meats (for protein).  But the hunting season was short, oft-times buffalo were not around… when they were roaming near, only what could be eaten immediately and dried for carrying from camp to camp was hunted and killed.  The Lakota were a definite waste-not /want-not people!

Since wild game is no longer as readily available, the Lakota should be considering meats that are from grass-fed animals. I know, I know…those are expensive!  It is your genetic ability to physically process foods, and your health we are talking about here!

Those that camped along the rivers did eat fish.  For example: the Sisseton-Wapeton bands of the Lakota or the Minnesota Dakota bands.  Although not mentioned in my research and studies, I would assume (like other foods) that fishing would have been a reasonable substitute for meats for all of the Lakota.  Fresh-water clams, mussels, and crayfish would have been as well.

Small game would have also been hunted and consumed.  This would include rabbits, prairie dogs, pheasant, squirrel (where there are woody areas), duck, and goose.  I would think that chicken would be a good choice, but again, make sure it’s what you have grown or those that are free-range.

The reason so many Lakota people have diabetes, and weight issues today is the shift in the people’s diet. Beef is marbled with more fat than wild game.  Beef was what was offered to families as food rations. Today, hamburger is a mainstay in the Lakota diet. Hamburger is NOT lean meat! Your bodies are more accustomed to lean grass-fed / free ranging animal meat such as deer or buffalo.

Then, there is the commodities program of canned everything, from U.S. surplus farm foods.  All of which had high sodium and corn syrup levels.  Yes, it kept starvation at bay…but the “can of worms” its distribution opened was detrimental to the health of the people.  This was not initially known when distributed by the USDA.

A person of Lakota descent should take in to consideration whether you have European blood within you, as well. The paleo diet may not be the sole consideration here, just saying.  That is for another discussion altogether!

Acid/ Alkaline pH Considerations

Many diseases are caused by pH imbalance.  Such as: diabetes, heart disease, arthritis to name a few.  Also disorders can be healed by eating correctly, such as: acid reflux, morning sickness, migraines, and constipation.

A vegetarian diet is mostly alkaline in nature.  This is due to the ratio of vegetables and fruits in the diet to proteins. Meats (red meats, beef, mutton, pork, salmon, herring, mackerel, lobster, shrimp and crayfish), millet, white rice, couscous, semolina, white breads, soda crackers, white refined sugars and items coated with it, lard and some lard-like products (Crisco) used for cooking, are all foods high in acid forming elements.

The traditional diet (According to Ron Goodman’s publication) for the pregnant woman was said to be minimal vegetables, and mostly deer and buffalo.  I would be inclined to think it would be wise to consider the seasons, in regards to what to eat regarding vegetables and fruits.  Yellow vegetables would have a high vitamin A and C content, which is very necessary to the pregnant woman and the growth of the baby.

I am inclined to think that with as much fruit and vegetables that were gathered in past times, that the information in Goddman’s book is not entirely accurate. Yes, wild free-ranging game was a part of the diet but so were the fruits and vegetables (and dried for winter food storage) that the women gathered.

In general, a good rule of thumb is to plate your food with 2/3 alkaline foods, and 1/3 acidic. Of the alkaline types of foods, you would chose traditional foods such as: corn, squash, and beans.  Wild greens can be used in soups.  If you need suggestions on this, let me know.  In the Orange to yellow vegetable bracket are squashes, pumpkins, and carrots.  Citric fruits are not a part of the Paleo diet.

What to Avoid:

Refined sugar, all processed foods (white bread, rolls, etc.), any of the typical sweetening substitutes such as Sweet and Low (a carcinogenic) except for stevia (which is plant-based and indigenous to South America), meats with nitrates such as lunch meats and some brands of bacon, fatty meats such as sausage or hamburger. Even though you may love your fry bread (as I do) that needs to be very limited (only at ceremony or special occasions). Most of the canned fruits used for Wojapi have an additional amount of corn syrups. Use fresh fruits instead.

Recommends:

Grow your own vegetables
Gather fruits in season, and dry them
Raise some chickens to lower food costs.

Paleo Plains Vegetarian Diet
REFERENCES:

Goodman, Ronald.  Lakota Star Knowledge.
Vasey, Christopher.  Acid Alkaline Diet for Optimum Health, The.  (1999) Healing Arts Press.

 

Plains PaleoVegetarian Nutrition for Pregnancy

wild-strawberry
Wild Strawberries

About Vegetarianism

The first thing you should know is that there are many types of vegetarians and styles of eating vegetarian.  The two most common are Lacto-Ovo (milk and eggs) and Ovo (eggs). There are also “semi-vegetarians” who mostly eat a vegetarian diet, with occasional additions of chicken, or fish.

My vegetarian cookbook mentions crusto-vegetarians who eat shell fish; mollo-vegetarians who eat clams, scallops, oysters or mullosks; repto-vegetarians who eats snakes and other reptiles…as examples of the few of many variations on the vegetarian diet.  For the Lakota, your diet could be called a Paleo Vegetarian diet.

What??

As Lakota people, consider this: your fore-mothers gathered tiƞpsila (wild turnips), ominiċa (beans — there is story about this vegetable and the importance of “giving back”), blo (wild potatoes), berries, wagameza (corn),  wagmu (squash) and many other fruits and vegetables.  There were healing plants that would have also found its way into the pot, as well. The people gathered eggs when possible, traded for corn and squash, and gathered wild rice (before coming out to the plains ̇ sometimes traded for it after being on the plains).

In the old stories about the first Huƞka “making of relatives” ceremony,  with the Arikira,  corn was given in the ceremony, by the Arikira. Corn is used in a soup with Ti̇ƞpsila and Tripe (buffalo guts).  This soup is used in ceremony.

Since many of you do not gather up your fruits and vegetables in the old way, what can you do? First, get fresh fruit and vegetables whenever possible, when in season (less expense).  Next to that would be dried or frozen.

Unfortunately, most of the dried foods found in stores around Native country are sulfured. “Organically made” dried foods are hard to find, and disproportionately expensive.

You can create a garden.  To do so you would need to use an old traditional practice of “the three sisters” for planting.  The garden would consist of beans, corn and squash. You can create low mounds with the  and bean plants (corn supporting the trailing bean) corn at the center of the top, a circle of squash plants surrounding it. The center of the top would have a slight indent to catch water from the summer thunder storms.

Grains are not a part of the Paleo diet, with an exception of wild rice by the northern bands of the Oċeti Ṡakowiƞ. Baked or fried bread never was a part of the old traditional diet, not even unleavened flat breads. But I was told that there was a dumpling made from starchy vegetables and formed into balls then placed into the soup.

Nuts were also gathered when the people were encamped.  So you can add some nuts to your diet for protein.  The best nut is the almond, and of course walnuts would have been gathered a long time ago, from the walnut trees.  If you choose to use acorns, make sure you understand the method to process them into edible food.  Pine nuts are excellent, too.

The Benefits of a Vegetarian Diet

If you have Diabetes, obesity, kidney or heart disease you can be assured that the vegetarian diet will help you to build your way back to good health. Too much meat eaten at a meal is hard for the digestive system, and often is transformed into acids.

“Most digestive disorders, such as indigestion, nausea, bloating, gastric reflux, are symptoms caused by excess acid in the gastric region and not enough alkaline minerals in the intestinal tract.[i]

Can you go Paleo AND do vegetarian? Why, yes.  Remember there are many types of vegetarian diets. You can play with the type of meats you use… but, always remember you need to purchase grass-fed, free-range, and you will be much healthier!

If you add eggs, these too should be free-range.  Milk should not be raw, but you should consider this: it was not a part of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota diet.  Women breastfed their babies sometimes until 7 years of age, and then no other milk was consumed.

Acid/ Alkaline pH Considerations

Many diseases are caused by pH imbalance.  Such as: diabetes, heart disease, arthritis to name a few.  Also disorders can be healed by eating correctly such as: acid reflux, morning sickness, migraines, and constipation.

A vegetarian diet is mostly alkaline in nature.  This is due to the ratio of vegetables and fruits in the diet to proteins. Meats (red meats, beef, mutton, pork, salmon, herring, mackerel, lobster, shrimp and crayfish), millet, white rice, couscous, semolina, white breads, soda crackers, white refined sugars and items coated with it, lard and some lard-like products (Crisco) used for cooking, are all foods high in acid forming elements.

In general, a good rule of thumb is to plate your food with 2/3 alkaline foods, and 1/3 acidic. Of the alkaline types of foods, you should choose any leafy green vegetables, but the ones highest in minerals and vitamins for re-building and maintaining good health are Kale, Bok Choy, and spinach.  In the Orange to yellow vegetable bracket are squashes, pumpkins, and carrots.  Citric fruits should be eaten early in the day for better digestion.

Foods to avoid:

Refined sugar, all processed foods (white bread, rolls, etc.), any of the typical sweetening substitutes such as Sweet and Low (a carcinogenic) except for stevia (which is plant-based). Even though you may love your fry bread (as I do) that needs to be very limited (only at ceremony or special occasions). Most of the canned fruits used for Wojapi have an additional amount of corn syrups, so use fresh fruits instead.

Paleo Diet for Pregnancy

REFERENCES:

Goodman, Ronald.  Lakota Star Knowledge.
Vasey, Christopher.  Acid Alkaline Diet for Optimum Health, The.  (1999) Healing Arts Press.

[i] How to Balance Your pH to Heal Your Body. http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-6243/How-to-Balance-Your-pH-to-Heal-Your-Body.html.

A Long Hiatus

My apologies to my readers…

I took a long hiatus from writing blogs about pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding.  I will be resuming blog-writing in September.

If there are any topics you would need information about, or just have an interest in, please let me know in the comments.

Thank you!

Baby Wearing – Part 2

Why would it be of benefit to you as a mother to carry your baby, using any method?

It would assure you that continuity is available for your baby.  After nine months of carrying the fetus, where gentle rocking motions were constant, it would make sense to allow for this continuity to continue outside the womb.

You and your baby are bonding in the first few months after birth. Babies need to feel, smell, and touch you for assurance.  It stresses baby to have separation from you.  Yet, you need to get things done, right? Baby-wearing allows for both!

It assists in cognitive development (Gross-Loh, 46) when you carry your baby. The baby is in a calm state, content, and observing all the time while learning about their world.

You learn about your baby as well. The attachment of mother and baby is strengthened; mother is able to understand baby’s cues easier which develop a mutual trust.
Let’s take a look at some of the various methods used (by country):

Mexican women use the Reboso, a traditional shawl wrap that usually would be given to girls at Menarche and worn as a shawl or neck wrap until needed for carrying a baby. The Lakota use a cradleboard, the Japanese and Malasian women carried babies on their backs…

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Things to Consider:

In the first six months after having a baby the hormone relaxin may be in your system. It is important to be aware of “postural adaptations that may adversely affect your spinal joints (Ohm, 18)”.  If feeling Fatigued or feeling muscles tightened (such as tightened muscles of the neck or shoulders).  Jeanne Ohm recommends a chiropractic visit.

When you are using your baby wrap, sling, or carrier consider your back.  The higher up and closer your baby is, the more comfort you will feel.

Consider the type of carrier you will use. Of great concern are the types of slings that are like a pouch and hand low, with lots of material.  It is potentially dangerous for the baby as the baby may lie in a “C” position with his/her chin tucked towards the chest.  This position can potentially cause breathing issues, or asphyxia (suffocation).

Baby Wearing – Part 1

Baby Wearing

USA 1920s
1950s – American Woman Carrying a Baby

Many cultures have used baby wearing for a variety of reasons.  Some cultures have lost the wisdom behind its use, and many have gravitated to more modern ways, such as the use of a stroller or pram to bring babies along with them on walks and to the store.

In pre-historical times mothers had to devise ways to forage and hunt while carrying for babies. Skins, bark, hand-woven reeds, or bark would have been constructed to assist in keeping baby close and safe. When woven fabrics were invented, women would have utilized long woven wraps or shawls to tie their babies into carrying positions either next to the chest or on their back.


A few words for baby carriers in various languages exist:

Amauti: an Inuit back pouch that was incorporated with the coat, the pouch created when cinched at the waist.  The baby was then held high up on the back lying on a bed of fur within the pouch.

Dakkohimo or onbuhimo: a Japanese carrier using cloth and straps that would go over the shoulders. It was worn either on the front or the back.  It could be used by the mother, siblings, or grandparents.

Mei tai:  Chinese fabric panel with for straps attached at each corner.  The bottom two straps are tied at the waist; the upper two crisscross either for front-carrying or back carrying. The fabric panel supports the whole torso.

Podaegi: used by Koreans used a blanket-like appearing traditional wrap that has straps.  Infant through toddler-aged were back-carried.

Kanga: a rectangular cloth that wraps around both mother and baby to assist back-carrying used in Kenya.

Selendang:  A rectangular batik cloth that is tucked and folded to form a sling is used by the women in Indonesia.

Can’ic’ik’oƞpa: The Lakota “cradle board” using two attached boards for carrying.
The Welsh kept their tradition of blanket-wrapping until the 50s, when it almost died out.  It is seeing somewhat of renewal today. You can see images here: Celtic Baby Carrying

Around the early 1900s the use of baby carrying or wearing became out of fashion, because of social ideas.  It was thought that only poor persons used this method.  It was deemed a method of “spoiling” a baby, to spend so much time in such close contact.

To continue on this topic see: Part 2

Anovulation and Irregular Cycles

No two females are the same.  Women have cycles that vary.  It is dependent on if she is an adolescent girl, just coming off the pill, breastfeeding, or is approaching menopause.

Women who live in close proximity do tend to cycle together.  You will notice this as you become more aware of your cycle, and your body.


A Typical Cycle

In what is considered a “normal” cycle, the release of the egg occurs in a predictable pattern.  After your menses, “under the influence of rising estrogen, you’ll usually have several days of no cervical fluid, building up to progressively wetter fertile-quality cervical fluid (103)”.  After the egg is released the cervical fluid will dry quickly. Then the pattern starts again.

Different Phases of Anovulation

Adolescence

The average age of American girls to begin menstruation is 12 to 14 years old. At this age, the onset of menses may not be due to the release of an egg.

One of the characteristics of cycles in teenage girls is the fluctuation of the estrogen cycles.  Therefore the cycle of a teenager is not predictable. The distance between menses and duration may vary, with some anovulatory cycles in between.

Breastfeeding

When breastfeeding “on demand” a woman may not have menses for months.  Every time the baby is breastfed the hormones that trigger ovulation are triggered. But, in order for it to work, the baby must feed regularly when baby indicates hunger (no supplementation).

A woman could go a year or more without a change in temperature, experiencing the same cervical fluid.  The reason that she would not see the good kind of cervical fluid, at first, is that prolactin will lower the estrogen levels and keep the fertile quality cervical fluid from being produced. The trick here is, to be able to notice if there is any change in the cervical fluid, which will indicate that ovulation is soon to resume.

Premenopause

Premenopause occurs prior to Menopause, when all ovulation and menses cease. It often will last for years. During this time, her cycles may start to be very different than usual. At first, the cycles may shorten because of more frequent ovulations and shorter luteal phases. As time goes on, the length of the cycles increases as the number of ovulations become more infrequent.  Finally the cycles end altogether.  If the woman is 40 or older and she has had no menses for a year or more, she is said to be in Menopause.

Other Major Causes of Anovulation

Illness

Normally, illnesses do not affect your cycle.  When illness affects your cycle depends upon the phase of your cycle you are in when you become ill, if before ovulation it may delay or cause no ovulation to occur… If after ovulation, it will rarely cause any problems.

A fever will not affect your ability to chart or interpret it.  There are other fertility signs. Not only that, you can still tell whether the temperature affected your cycle in either delaying or preventing the cycle.

Travel 

Travel is notorious for causing an effect on the cycle.  Some women do manage to be regular like clock-work despite traveling.

Your body may interpret traveling as a stressor.  Some women may find that they have an extended cycle while others do not ovulate at all…in fact stop menstruating altogether.  Despite all this, and the fun of travel, you will find charting using all three signs is beneficial to notate the ambiguities.

 Exercise

Heads up!  Strenuous exercise is a well-known cycle buster!  It can delay or stop ovulation.  Exercise mostly affects competitive athletes with low body fat ratios.  For women, it is mostly those who are runners swimmers, gymnasts, and ballet dancers that have issues.  But metabolism, thyroid, and diet must be ruled out first.

Weight Loss or Gain

To maintain normal ovulatory cycles, a woman’s body weight should be a minimum of 20% body fat.  This is in order to have the body store estrogen and to allow for androgen conversion into to the kind of estrogen necessary for ovulation.

Women who are extremely thin, especially those with anorexia, tend to have their menses stop.  This is due to not having enough estrogen to cause ovulation.

Stress

Long cycles are often caused by stress. Stresses can be either psychological or physical. Stress tends to delay ovulation rather than cause an earlier ovulation cycle. Therefore, the later the ovulation occurs the cycle becomes longer. If stress is severe it can cause ovulation to stop altogether.

Medical Conditions

A variety of medical conditions can cause menses to cease.  These are:

  • Elevated prolactin
  • Pituitary gland problems
  • Polycystic ovarian syndrome

A common and useful way to determine the cause of anovulation is with a Progesterone Withdrawal Test.
NOTE:

For both breastfeeding and Premenopause, the use of FAM as your contraception method can be tricky at best.

Natural Contraception – Part 3

chart


The Four Rules

  1.  First Five Days Rule

You are safe during the first five days of the menstrual cycle if you have had an obvious temperature shift about 12 to 16 days prior.

This applies to the first five days of the cycle. Any bleeding after should be considered fertile whether you bleed or not. Bleeding in that 5 day period is true menstruation, not spotting or abnormal bleeding.

This rule can only work if you have been charting your cervical fluid and temperature for awhile. You cannot rely on this rule if you are approaching menopausal age and if any of the signs of menopause are present[i].  This is due to the hormonal fluctuations that occur in Premenopause.

If your last 12 cycles were 25 days or shorter, you should then assume only 3 days are safe.  This precaution is due to the fact that you could ovulate earlier.  You would not be able to detect cervical fluid change due to bleeding.

  1. Dry day Rule

    Before ovulation you are safe any evening of every dry day[ii].

    Dryness[iii] is determined by periodic checks of cervical fluid throughout the day. There should be no wet or any kind of fluid.

It must not be “sticky” either.  Although sticky fluids may not be conducive to fertility, err on the safe side. Many women cannot distinguish between the sticky fluid and the wet fertile cervical fluids.  But if you have a couple “sticky” days and then return to dry, you are then considered safe on the dry days.

on the day after intercourse you chart that day with a question mark if semen or spermicide is present, these tend to mask cervical fluid. Because the fluids are masked that evening is considered fertile, since you cannot determine “wet” or “dry” cervical fluid.  But if by the end of the day after intercourse you are dry and have been all day, you are safe.

Remember: sperm cannot survive with a dry cervix.  The longest that the sperm stays alive is just a few hours. The sticky fluid of the cervix is just about as inhospitable as a dry cervix, so the risk is low.

  1. Temperature Shift Rule

    You are safe the evening of the 3rd consecutive day your temperature is above the cover-line.

You are infertile starting at 6 p.m. the third consecutive night that your temperature is above the cover-line.   If the temperature falls on or below the cover-line during that three day time frame, you must start your counting over until  it is above the line again.

If you develop a fever due to illness, you cannot consider yourself safe until you have had and recorded three days consecutively of normal temperatures above the cover-line.  If you have had no obvious thermal shift use a more conservative rule.  This would mean you would consider yourself safe only until the evening of the third day you are above the line.

  1. Peak Day Rule
    You are safe the evening of the 4th consecutive day after your peak day

Your peak day is the last day of “wetness”.  On the chart mark “PK” in the peak day column.  Subsequent days should be marked as “1”, “2”, “3”, etc., in that same row.  You should record them only in the evening after having observed your cervical fluid.

You are considered safe on the 4th consecutive day following a “peak day”after 6 p.m. Draw a vertical line on the 3rd and 4th day to indicate your being safe from day four.


Putting it all together

  • The peak day of cervical fluids typically occurs a couple of days before the temperature rises.
  • Before ovulation, the cervical fluid is the critical fertility sign to observe
  • But after ovulation , it is the temperature that is a critical sign.
  • The rules that apply to ovulation will often work in harmony with each other, so the the 3rd evening of high temperatures will coincide with the 4th evening after the peak day.
  • However:
    • If there is a discrepancy between the two post-ovulatory rules, always wait until both signs indicate infertility.
    • If it is critical that you avoid pregnancy, do not take the chance of unprotected sex!

 

[i] Hot flashes, vaginal dryness, etc.

[ii] After 6 p.m.

[iii] No fluids present, the slight moisture at the vaginal opening is not “wet” per se.

Natural Contraception – Part 2

The Fertility Awareness Method [FAM] works as a contraceptive only if you choose to either postpone intercourse or use a barrier method when you are fertile. You should be aware the method is most effective when you abstain.

chart

Here are the reasons why:

  1. If the barrier method is going to fail, it will fail when you are in the fertile phase. ALL contraceptives have a failure rate.
  2. Using barriers with spermicides during the fertile phase can mask your cervical fluid.


Drawing the “Cover Line” For Charting

The purpose for charting your temperature is determine when ovulation occurs.  Your temperature rises on the days after.  But to accurately do this, you need to draw a cover line.

The instructions are as follows:

  • After your menstruation ends and when charting your temperatures, always notice the highest temperature of the previous 6 days.
  • Identify the first day your temperature rises at least 2/10ths of a degree above the highest temperature
  • Now, go back and highlight the last 6 temperatures before the rise
  • Draw the coverline 1/10th of a degree above the highest of that cluster of 6 highlighted days


Charting Cervical Fluids

 Day 1 of the cycle is the first day menstrual bleeding. Brown or light spotting prior is considered a part of the last cycle.

  • The graph below shows how the various types of cervical fluids are recorded in your chart.
    Note: Menses are marked with
    * while spotting is marked (*)


Menses:  Red Blood Flow

Eggwhite          
Creamy          
Sticky          
Dry, Spotting or Menses *        


Spotting: Brown, pink, discolored

Eggwhite          
Creamy          
Sticky          
Dry, Spotting or Menses *  (*)      

Nothing:

Eggwhite          
Creamy          
Sticky          
Dry, Spotting or Menses *  (*)  —    

Sticky:

It is opaque, white, or yellow, and occasionally clear.  Can be thick.  The main quality is stickiness or lacking true moisture.  It can be crumbly or flaky like a paste, of gummy and rubbery (similar to rubber cement). When separating fingers it forms peaks.

Eggwhite          
Creamy          
Sticky        fill in box
 
Dry, Spotting or Menses  *  (*)  —    


Creamy:

Milky, cloudy, white or yellow in color.  Is “creamy” like lotion.  Can be wet, watery or thin in nature.  Does not form peaks when separating fingers.

Eggwhite          
Creamy      
 fill in
Sticky        fill in
 fill in
Dry, Spotting or Menses *  (*)  —    

Eggwhite:

Usually it is clear, but can have opaque streaks in it.  Very slippery and wet like an eggwhite. Feels like extreme lubrication in the vaginal opening.

Eggwhite        
Creamy      
 fill in
Sticky        fill in
 fill in
Dry, Spotting or Menses *  (*)  —    

NOTE: There would be an additional column on the right side, but due to constraints in page size, is omitted. The last column not shown has “eggwhite, “creamy”, and “sticky” boxes filled in.