Recipes – Part 3

LUNCH

Carrot and Lentil Soup

carrot n lentil soup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

2 tsp cumin seeds or 1 tsp cumin (ground)
pinch of chili flakes
1 cup vegetable broth
1 cup split red lentils (rinsed and drained)
carrots, 6-8 large or package of baby carrots / chopped
yogurt  /or cilantro (fresh)Naan or Pita bread

Instructions:

Heat a large saucepan and dry-fry the cumin seeds and chilli flakes for 1 min, or until they start to jump around the pan and release their aromas. Scoop out about half of the seeds with a spoon and set aside. Add the oil, carrot, lentils, stock and milk to the pan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 15 mins until the lentils have swollen and softened.

Whizz the soup with a stick blender or in a food processor until smooth (or leave it chunky if you prefer). Season to taste and finish with a dollop of yogurt/ or chopped cilantro, and a sprinkling of the reserved toasted spices. Serve with warmed naan / or pita breads.


Crepes

Use Krusteaz Buckwheat pancake mix to make the batter for crepes, but a bit thinner.

FILLING

2 lb young spinach leaves
2 tbs. water
1 bunch spring onions/ chop both white and green parts
2 tsp oil
1 egg beaten
1 egg yolk
1 cup cottage cheese
½ tsp nutmeg
¼ cup grated sharp cheddar cheese (or regular)
¼ cup walnut pieces
salt and pepper.

Instructions:

Make the batter for pancakes

Then:

wash and pack spinach into a pan with water, 5-6 minutes until soft
Drain well and let cool.
Gently fry the spring onions I oil until just soft, drain and set aside
Brush a small fry pan with oil, pour enough batter to fill the base, let cook 1-2 minutes (until set),
flip ver and cook one minute, until golden on underside. Turn onto a warmed plate. Repeat to make 8-10 crepes layering with baking parchment.
Chop and dry spinach and then mix with spring onions, beaten egg, egg yolk, cottafe cheese, nutmeg, and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Line cookie sheet with baking parchment
Layer crepes and spinach mixture / ending with a crepe. Sprinkle with cheddar cheese and bake in PREHEATED oven, 375 degrees F. for 20-25 minutes until firm and golden.
Sprinkle with walnuts and serve immediately.

Nutritional Information: 467 cal., 29g protein, 10g sugars, 31g carb, 26g Fat


SUPPER

Italian Soup

Ingredients:

Kale (1/2 to one bunch / depending on how much vegetables you would like)
Potatoes (6-8)
Italian Sausage (a pound of)
1 chopped RED Onion
2 cloves garlic
1 cup coconut milk
1 TSP Thyme / 1 TSP Basil

Instructions:

Chop sausage, onion, and garlic then fry on low temperature with a teeny bit of Olive oil in a large pot. While it is cooking, chop potatoes. When sausage is golden browned, add 6-8 cups of water to the pot. Let it come to a boil, then turn down to allow it to simmer. After 10 minutes, add chopped potatoes. Now rinse and chop kale (strip green parts from center white “vein”). After 5 minutes of potatoes cooking, add the milk, one tsp. thyme and kale to the soup. If you want the juice thicker, add some corn starch*.

You can make sourdough bread as a side, or biscuits

Serves 4-6 people

*Next topic coming up: Morning Sickness

 

Recipes – Part 2

SNACKS

Kale or Cabbage Chips

cabbagechips1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

INGREDIENTS

Kale OR cabbage
Parchment paper
Mrs. Dash “Original Blend”
spray oil

INSTRUCTIONS

Rinse kale or cabbage, and turn on oven to 250 degrees. While it warms, Kale: trim all the green portions from center white/or red “vein” looking parts…for cabbage cut the center core out, and separate the leaves. For both Kale and Cabbage: chop into (about) 1 inch squares. Place baking parchment paper on a cookie sheet, arrange the pieces of kale with just a little space between each. Spray olive oil over the pieces and lightly sprinkle Mrs. Dash “Original Blend” over the pieces.

Bake checking often.
After the kale/ or cabbage cools, put into a covered container.

 

Hummus (plain)

INGREDIENTS

olive oil
garlic
lemon
Tahini
Garbanzo beans or “Chickpeas”
paprika

INSTRUCTIONS

Drain and rinse 1 can of chickpeas (garbanzo beans) and put into blender

Add:
3 Tbsp. Of olive oil
Peeled and chopped up, 1 garlic clove
Squeeze in fresh lemon from one medium lemon
Start with 1 Tbsp. of Tahini (make sure you mix in the oil first); once you have gotten used to the flavors you can add more… up to 3 Tbs.

Blend (if too thick, add a little water)

Lightly sprinkle with paprika, when ready to dip.

(This recipe can be varied by adding:  a few artichoke hearts or olives).
You can eat this with pita chips, lightly salted corn chips, or with carrots, celery, radishes, etc.
The usual serving size is two tablespoons.

Nutritional Information: Tahini (1 Tbsp.) = 80 calories, 3 g protein, 1 g. fiber, 0 g. sugar, 37 g. sodium
1/3 of garbanzos = 105 calories, 6 g. protein, 0 g. sugar, 20% of daily fiber, 470 g. sodium (this is why they should be rinsed), Potassium 250 mg., 10% of daily iron, 2 g. fat, 4% of daily calcium
Olive Oil (1 Tbsp.) = 120 calories, 14 g. fat, 0 g. sodium


Bruchetta

INGREDIENTS

capers
lemon
fresh parsley
olive oil
garlic
fresh basil
1 package of pita bread (preferably whole wheat)

INSTRUCTIONS

Drain and rinse one can of olives, place into blender

Add a whole cup of fresh Basil
Add a whole cup of chopped parsley (preferably Italian)/ cilantro can be substituted.
1 Tbsp. Capers
1 squeezed lemon
3 Tbsp. Olive Oil
1-2 cloves garlic

BLEND (can be small chunks)

Serve on sliced sourdough bread or eat with pita chips

Baked Pita Chips

Ingredients:

Whole wheat pita bread
spray olive oil

Preheat oven to 250 degrees, and line with parchment paper (for baking).

chop Pita bread into triangles
spray with olive oil
Bake until crispy (watch them, ovens vary)

 

 

Recipes – Part 1

This blog will be the beginning of three blogs with some of my favorite nutritional recipes

that are excellent nutritional sources, and TASTY!

butternut squash n pumpkin pancakes

 

RECIPES
Breakfasts
Butternut Squash (or pumpkin) pancakes

Mashed baked butternut squash or small pumpkin (1/4 to 1/3 can of pumpkin)
1 egg (or one individual cup of applesauce)
½ cup skim milk (add more if not thin enough)
1 cups whole wheat pastry flour
2 tsp baking powder
½ tsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp ground cloves
1 tbl vegetable oil or spray oil for keeping pancakes from sticking

Bake the squash (or pumpkin) at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. Peel, seed, and mash. Let it cool off. In a bowl combine the squash (or pumpkin) with egg, and milk. In a separate bowl combine and stir all the dry ingredients, and add to the wet ingredients. Measure ¼ cup per pancake, and pour onto hot griddle or pan, when golden brown, flip.

Nutritional Information: 101 cal. 4g prot. 2 gr fat 18g carb 17 mg cholesterol 3 gr fiber.
For added protein, serve with vanilla yogurt on top.
Makes 8-10 pancakes

 

Maple-Walnut Granola

6 cups rolled oats
2 cups walnuts chopped coarsely
½ to 1 cup sesame seeds
1 cup barley or whole wheat pastry flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground allspice
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg or cardamom
½ teaspoon salt (can be omitted)
¾ cup maple syrup
¾ cup honey
½ vegetable oil
2 tablespoon frozen orange juice concentrate (or 2 teaspoons vanilla extract)
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. Combine all the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl whisk all liquid ingredients until a creamy consistency. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, and blend well. Divide into half the ingredients into one of two cookie sheets or two large baking pans making sure that the granola is nor more than 1 inch deep.
Bake for one 1 hour turning the granola with a spatula every 15 minutes. After 20 minutes, switch up the position of the pans (top to bottom/vice-versa). After an hour, remove and let cool. The granola will become crunchy as it cools. Store in an air-tight container.

Makes 8 cups Good with Yogurt, as topping on other hot cereals, and can be used with ice cream for a dessert!
Nutritional Information: Per ¼ cup serving: 201 cal., 10g. Fat, 5g. Protein, 26g Carb, 0mg cholesterol, 37g sodium (less if salt is omitted), 0.5g Fiber.

Herbal Teas – Part 5

red clover illusRed Clover
Trifolium pratense, L.

Constituents: Phenolic glycosides, isoflavones, flavonoids, salicylates, coumarins, cyanogenic, glycocides, mineral acids, vitamins

Actions: Alterative, antispasmodic, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, expectorant, possible estrogen activity

Common Names: Purple Clover, Trefoil, Cleaver grass, Cow grass

Medical Parts: flowers and leaves


USE:

Renal Conditions (233) IHONA

“Very soothing for the nerves” (233) IHONA

As a gargle for sore throats (234) IHONA

Promotes fertility, restores hormonal balance, and balances Alkaline/Acid.  (2) WWHCY

Useful for coughs, and colds…mucus congestion (220) TWOH

Stimulates the liver and gallbladder/for constipation and sluggish appetite. Outside the body a fomentation is used for rheumatic or gouty pains, and to soften hardened milk glands (395) THB

Ointment: Lymphatic swelling (128) CGTMH

Eye Infection (99) WWHCY

Homeopathic: Cancer, constipation, cough, mumps, pancreas (affections of), throat (sore, mucus in), Uvula (pain in). (234) IHONA

 

VITAMINS AND MINERALS: Vitamin B1, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, and Calcium.

References:

Gladstar, Rosemary. (1993) Herbal Healing for Women. Fireside Books: New York.

Hutchens, Alma R. (1991) Indian Herbalogy of North America. Shambhala: Boston.

Lust, John. (1983) The Herb Book. Bantam Books, NY

Ody, Penelope. (2000) Natural Health: Complete Guide to Medicinal Herbs. Dorling/Kindersley Lmt.: London.

Romm, Aviva Jill.  (2003) The Natural Pregnancy Book: herbs, nutrition, and other holistic choices. Celestial Arts: Berkeley

Tierra, Michael. (1990) The Way of Herbs. Pocket Books: New York

Weed, Susan S. (1986) The Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year. Ashtree Publishing; Woodstock NY

Herbal Teas – Part 4

nettleNettle
Urtica dioica

Constituents: Histimine, formic acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, glucoquinones, many minerals (incl. silica), vitamins A, B, C, tannins.

Actions: Astrigent, diuretic, tonic, nutritive, stops bleeding, circulatory stimulant, promotes milk flow, lowers blood sugar levels, prevents scurvy.

Nettles take minerals, including iron, from the soil and the aerial parts are a good tonic for anemia; high vitamin C content in the plant helps ensure that the iron is properly absorbed. Clears uric acid from the system to relieve gout and arthritis, and the astringency stops bleeding. (131) CGTMH

Said to reduce Rheumatic problems, stimulates the digestive system and promotes milk flow in breastfeeding women. Used for excessive menstruation flow and blood in urine. (191) THB

Good for asthma, chronic and acute urinary complaints, urinary stones, nephritis, and cystitis. Nettle also used for helping with diarrhea, dysentery, hemorrhoids and chronic arthritis and rheumatic problems. (202) TWOH

Nettle is considered to be an herb that is “rich” in calcium, iron, and numerous other vitamins and minerals.  It is an herb that is recommended for pregnant women who have low energy or suffer from chronic fatigue.  Nettle aids as a diuretic, to eliminate excess water from the body. This herb is considered a pregnancy “Tonic”, which stems from Native American usage as a pregnancy tonic, a preventative of hemorrhaging after birthing, and energy restoration after childbirth . (177) HHFW

It is an anemia preventative, reduces varicosities, and decreases the likelihood of hemorrhaging during childbirth. TNPB

Nettle will expel phlem from the lungs and stomach; clean the urinary canal, valuable for diarrhea, dysentery, piles, as well as inflammation of the kidneys.  IHONA

Nettle is known to increase male and female fertility, will assist in the rebuilding of kidney function as well as kidney stone removal. Eases leg cramps and muscle spasms.  High in Calcium, vitamin K. WWHCBY

VITAMINS AND MINERALS: The tea is a good source of Iron, Calcium, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, and Vitamin A

References:

Gladstar, Rosemary. (1993) Herbal Healing for Women. Fireside Books: New York.

Hutchens, Alma R. (1991) Indian Herbalogy of North America. Shambhala: Boston.

Lust, John. (1983) The Herb Book. Bantam Books, NY

Ody, Penelope. (2000) Natural Health: Complete Guide to Medicinal Herbs. Dorling/Kindersley Lmt.: London.

Romm, Aviva Jill.  (2003) The Natural Pregnancy Book: herbs, nutrition, and other holistic choices. Celestial Arts: Berkeley

Tierra, Michael. (1990) The Way of Herbs. Pocket Books: New York

Weed, Susan S. (1986) The Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year. Ashtree Publishing; Woodstock NY

Herbal Teas – Part 3

nettle Nettle Leaf
Urtica dioica


Constituents: Histamine, formic acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, glucoquinones, many minerals (incl. silica), vitamins A, B, C, tannins.

Actions: Astringent, diuretic, tonic, nutritive, stops bleeding, circulatory stimulant, promotes milk flow, lowers blood sugar levels, prevents scurvy.

Nettles take minerals, including iron, from the soil and the aerial parts are a good tonic for anemia; high vitamin C content in the plant helps ensure that the iron is properly absorbed. Clears uric acid from the system to relieve gout and arthritis, and the astringency stops bleeding. (131) CGTMH

Said to reduce Rheumatic problems, stimulates the digestive system and promotes milk flow in breastfeeding women. Used for excessive menstruation flow and blood in urine. (191) THB

Good for asthma, chronic and acute urinary complaints, urinary stones, nephritis, and cystitis. Nettle also used for helping with diarrhea, dysentery, hemorrhoids and chronic arthritis and rheumatic problems. (202) TWOH

Nettle is considered to be an herb that is “rich” in calcium, iron, and numerous other vitamins and minerals.  It is an herb that is recommended for pregnant women who have low energy or suffer from chronic fatigue.  Nettle aids as a diuretic, to eliminate excess water from the body. This herb is considered a pregnancy “Tonic”, which stems from Native American usage as a pregnancy tonic, a preventative of hemorrhaging after birthing, and energy restoration after childbirth. (177) HHFW

It is an anemia preventative, reduces varicosities, and decreases the likelihood of hemorrhaging during childbirth. TNPB

Nettle will expel phlegm from the lungs and stomach; clean the urinary canal, valuable for diarrhea, dysentery, piles, as well as inflammation of the kidneys.  IHONA

Nettle is known to increase male and female fertility, will assist in the rebuilding of kidney function as well as kidney stone removal. Eases leg cramps and muscle spasms.  High in Calcium, vitamin K. WWHCBY

VITAMIN AND MINERAL CONTENT:

Vitamins A, C, D. and K, Calcium, Potassium, Phosphorus, Iron and Sulphur.

REFERENCES

Gladstar, Rosemary. (1993) Herbal Healing for Women. Fireside Books: New York.

Hutchens, Alma R. (1991) Indian Herbalogy of North America. Shambhala: Boston.

Lust, John. (1983) The Herb Book. Bantam Books, NY

Ody, Penelope. (2000) Natural Health: Complete Guide to Medicinal Herbs. Dorling/Kindersley Lmt.: London.

Romm, Aviva Jill.  (2003) The Natural Pregnancy Book: herbs, nutrition, and other holistic choices. Celestial Arts: Berkeley

Tierra, Michael. (1990)  The Way of Herbs. Pocket Books: New York

Weed, Susan. (1986)  Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year. Ashtree Publishing; Woodstock

 

 

Herbal Teas – Part 1

HOW TO MAKE AN HERBAL INFUSION

Herbal infusions are made with the “aerial parts”  of the plant. This would be the leaves, flowers, or “fruits”.  Generally, for most infusions you would heat your water to boiling, then add your plant matter to the water.  At this point, you would cover and let it steep 5-15 minutes.

For herbs used in pregnancy, the time allotted is a bit different.  You would want to let it steep a minimum of 2 hours. Some teas are better having been allowed to steep up to 8 hours.

If you can afford it, buy a good 4-6 cup teapot.  It makes this longer brewing process much easier.  You can also buy or make a “tea cozy” (a padded warmer for the tea pot) or wrap the teapot with a heavy kitchen towel. It will keep the hot water warm for a longer period of time, to allow for the longer steeping time frame.

If you are making a brew with roots, bark, nuts or seeds…you would bring the water to a boil and then turn down the heat. Let it simmer for at least 30 minutes or until 1/4 to 1/3 of the water is gone.  This allows for the hot water to extract the portion of the roots, bark, or seeds that you need. This is called a: decoction.

For this set of discussions, you are going to use the infusion method.  This method works best for the teas I will be discussing in the next four blogs. The next four blogs will be information on the teas most recommended for women during the childbearing years. They are highly recommended for pregnancy, but can be a beverage to drink before and after pregnancy as well.

All the herbs recommended are packed with nourishing vitamin content.  The herbs are good for the body and good for the growing baby!

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