FYI for native women

Just an FYI for all of you…

 

Midwives Resistance: How Native Women are Reclaiming Birth on Their Terms

Mana Preconference/for native midwives

2 FULL DAYS:

Indigenous Midwifery: Ancestral Knowledge Keepers – $150. (Proceeds go to Native American Midwives Alliance)

When: October 14-15, 8:00-5:00PM

Indigenous Birthworkers Network Birthworkers who are Midwives, Doulas, mothers…

Midwifery is On the Rise In Native Communities

Nicolle Gonzales CNM ~ Blessingway of a Native American Midwife  Video

Midwives of Color

2018 American Indian and Alaska Native National Behavioral Health Conference

View original post

Advertisements

Pain in Childbirth – Part 2

father in delivery room

What contributes to PAIN in labor?

Fatigue

Muscles that are stretched, hurt. The muscles of the uterus work faster, the blood and oxygen flow is lessened. When there is tension, the uterus works even harder and fatigue sets in. The tension of the surrounding muscles has created a “brick wall”. So, relax.

Tension

The stretching of the lower uterine portion and the intense contractions of the upper uterine muscle are what is thought to be the source of the pain felt. But these muscles actually have very few pain receptors. You would not feel the pain unless the muscles were forced to work in an unnatural manner. If tense and fearful the nerve endings of the muscles and tissues around the uterus send messages to the pain receptors. There is a direct correlation of tension to pain.

Tired muscles

The biochemistry of the muscle is imbalance when tired. It creates tension that sends out more electrical activity. The physiological changes will lower the point at which the muscle will hurt.

The outlet is too small, or baby too big

These actually do not need to be an issue. Usually the position of the baby or laboring mother, are the causative factor of pain. The pain messages are signaling that something isn’t right. What will help is a change of position of the mother.

Get out of the horizontal position, to a vertical one, and things will change. The baby is assisted (most of the time) to re-position him/or herself in the womb to facilitate birth without as much pain. As stated in a different hand-out, just doing this type of change in position opens the outlet by 20%.

Fear

Information is out there on all the things that “can go wrong”. We are not taught that birthing is a natural process; we women are pummeled with media and other females telling horror stories about birth.

There is a shroud over the whole process of birth, making it seem to be a great mystery. What is needed is correct information.

Your uterus is a magnificent muscle which is affected by the neuro-hormonal pathway that connects the brain, the circulatory system and the uterus. Fear causes an alteration of the pathway creating a reduction of blood and oxygen to the brain. This results in the tightening of the cervical opening of the womb.

Fear unbalances the hormones of the body. Being fearful causes the release of labor inhibiting hormones. These are the stress hormones of the adrenal glands that when in stress, we release hormones that are the fight-or-flight mechanisms. Animals also have them, and the hormones are released to stop labor allowing them to find a safe place for birthing. These then block the labor enhancing hormones . This lengthens the labor and increases the pain felt.

A well-informed, correct education about birthing will assist you. Make sure your labor supporters also have been educated so that their fear is not surrounding you when you are in labor.

Occasionally, the sensation of pain will continue, even after all the relaxation techniques are implemented. This may be due to a tightened psoas muscle or mal-aligned hip. Both can cause tension in the body, and / or problems with the baby being delivered easily. These two issues can be checked, and remedied.

The Natural Pain relieving Narcotic: Endorphins

“Circulating throughout the body are natural hormones that relax you when stressed and relieve pain when you hurt (138)”

What is sad is that most women do not know about these hormones, or that they can activate them when needed. In the 1970s studies were being done for drug addiction and the presence of these hormones in the receptor sites of the brain (for morphine-like substances). What was found was that the nerve cells that are attached to receptor sites, had chemical pain relievers that acted to dull the sensation of pain in the cells. Here is how they can work for you:

As you probably know, Endorphins are raised during exercise and well, labor is strenuous exercise!

  • When the abdomen contracts in labor, the Endorphin level is raised.
    o This is especially true in the second stage of labor.
    o They are the highest after labor, and two weeks beyond.
    Endorphins are highest during vaginal birth, not so much when labor was started but delivery was cesarean.
  • Endorphins are higher in newborns that had signs of fetal distress during their delivery.
    o Baby also receives Endorphins during birth.
  • The release of Endorphins also will stimulate the production of prolactin, the hormone that relaxes and creates the “mothering” sensation.
    o Prolactin regulates milk production, which boosts the interaction with baby and mother.
    o These hormones are what researchers think are the cause of the “birth high”.
  • Mothers who had surgical birth have lowered hormone levels, which would account for the delay in milk supply after cesarean birth.
  • Endorphin production is directly tied to a person’s emotional state.
    o So if stress and anxiety are not resolved the body increases the stress hormones, Catecholamines, which counteract the relaxation produced by Endorphins.
    o Like commercial narcotics, Endorphins may behave differently woman to woman, which is why some women may feel more pain than others.
  • Injectable narcotics give you a bit of blast of pain relief, whereas Endorphins give you a steady dose throughout labor.

Women in labor are very aware of the natural hormone effects and describe the experience as a “natural high”.

Pain in Childbirth – Part 1

father in delivery room
Biological Purpose of Pain

The human body responds to pain with either the response to flee, or the response to stand and fight. Some responses are automatic, such as the immediate withdrawal of the hand when burned accidently. External pains can be avoided.

But, what is known as visceral (ves-er-al) pain cannot be escaped. These are ones from the internal organs, and the uterus is an internal organ. This is in the case of normal and natural function, not a diseased state.

Extreme hunger or excessive thirst are due to physiological imbalance. These can be painful, but satiated by eating and drinking.

How Pain is Felt

On the body surface and on the outside of various organs are nerve endings. These were heightened during man’s primitive days, as sensors when man was attacked by creatures with tooth and claw. Certain exterior areas are very sensitive such as the neck, under the arms, abdomen, and chest.

The internal organs also have receptors, but only register with pain mechanisms when the external area is severely injured. The interesting thing is “the intestines and uterus can be burnt, cauterized, handled and moved without any sensation of discomfort to the patient,…(34)”. But if either has been torn or stretched the receptors respond with pain. The question we have to ask is why only during birth is the sensation of pain felt…a normal function.

The nerves send the information to the part of the brain called the thalamus. Here the intensity of the pain is interpreted. Then they are sent to the outer cortex of the brain to be balanced and qualified. The response to the messages from the Thalamus would be dependent upon the magnitude of the message by the Thalamus. The strongest response is fear, which brings about the most motor responses.

The thing to emphasize here is that this response is recognized in the normal and uncomplicated labor. The degree of neuro-response mechanism is determined by the state of the particular woman who has the pain. One may get a sense of total agony, and feel she is in great discomfort. While another woman may sense that it is not intense agonizing pain. It depends on the mental state of the person.

For the woman in birth the first time, the pain sensation will cause tension. This tension sets the stage for a flight reaction, that causes the uterine muscles that are circumventing the lower portion of the uterus to tighten. The longitudinal muscles are then constricted.
It is the longitudinal muscles that work to assist the fetus to be expelled at birth. The circulatory muscular portion of the uterus causes the longitudinal muscles to struggle in the effort to dilate the cervix. They work in opposition rendering the lower portion of the uterus and outlet resistant to dilation. The two opposite reactions in the muscular structure is then interpreted by the brain as pain.

Therefore, the fear OF pain produces ACTUAL pain.

We are so conditioned to believe that childbirth must be painful. Even Hollywood’s depiction is of childbirth as a painful ordeal, showing women screaming in agony.
It does not have to be this way…

Pain in any other part of the body at any other time is an indicator or “alarm” that something is not right. In labor it is also…an indicator that you need to RELAX.

Pain in labor releases a hormone that inhibits labor.

Varicose Veins

WHAT ARE THEY?

Varicose-Vein

Varicose veins occur when the valves (that keep the blood flowing one way through the vessels) have become weak, which allow the blood to pool in the veins. This “pooling” causes the veins to become lax and distended.

CAUSES:

  • May be due to diet
  • Lack of exercise
  • Heredity
  • Hormone changes can cause the laxity of the valves
  • Pregnancy can be a predisposition for some women
    -Because there is a congestion of the blood in the lower extremities due to pressure from the uterus.
    -The return of blood from the legs to the pelvic area is reduced by the heavier uterus.

They are most common in the legs, ankles and feet. They can also show up in vulva (Vulvar variscosities) and anus (as Hemorrhoids). They become more pronounced as the pregnancy advances.

The vulvar variscosities usually are not noticible until birth. Some women notice the large ones during pregnancy. A gentle birth and hot compresses applied to the large distended veins will reduce damage or trauma to the veins. Occasionally bleeding or hematoma (internal pooling of blood) can occur and will require medical care.

Hemorrhoids become evident after birth, normally. So the use of gentle birthing will help with these as well. Constipation will aggravate hemorrhoids, and should be treated (although, following a good diet will reduce constipation due to the additional fiber from foods).

Usually the varicose veins will empty quite quickly after pregnancy. They are quite common during pregnancy, and usually repair is not considered during that time.

RECOMMENDATIONS

• Eat well, and drink lots of water
• Exercise! Exercise improves the circulation, and assists in both the prevention of and treatment for varicosities.
-Brisk walks for 30 minutes each day
-Or ride a stationary bike for the same length of time as walking
-Swim
-Yoga
-Belly dance moves such as pelvic rocks, and rolling/rocking the hips in a figure-eight.
-Dance!
• At least 20 minutes twice a day with feet elevated higher than the heart
• Do NOT sit in one place for too long. This would encourage insufficient pelvic and leg circulation.
• If you have severe varicose veins use support stockings (you can find them at a drug store.
• Use visualization to reduce the size and number of the varicose veins.
• You need to consider who / what is your support. You are not superwoman, and will need support during this very exciting time in your life!

CAUTION: Never massage the varicose veins! Massaging the veins can cause clots to dislodge and lead to an embolism. Embolisms are dangerous! If you see signs of phlebitis (swelling, heat, pain, infections around the veins) you should see the doctor or midwife right away.

DIETARY RECOMMENDATIONS

Follow the “baby wise” diet . Be especially careful to eat whole grains, high quality proteins, fresh vegetable and fruits as often as you can.

• Vitamin C with bioflavonoids is vital for assisting the walls of your veins to be strong.
• Foods with high vitamin C: citrus fruits, rose hips, dark green leafy vegetbles, cherries, alfalfa sprouts, strawberries, cantaloupe, broccoli, tomatioes, and green peppers.
• An additional 2,000 mg. of C with bioflavonoids can also help
• Vitamin E also is good for the vascular system. Take 200 to 600 IU a day. If you have heart or blood pressure problems begin with 50 IU and work up to 400 IU over a three month time-frame.
• B complex vitamins. Whole grains, nutritional yeast (I take mine in orange juice), and yogurt (its helps maintain intestinal integrity ).
• Green Vegetables…romaine (stop eating the low-vitamin Iceburg variety) lettuce, butter lettuce, turnip greens, kale, collards, mustard greens, dandelion greens, and turnip greens. Steam these, do not boil!

HERBALS

• Nettle leaf tea (One herb in the “Pregnancy Tea” blend I use) . Infuse by making 1 ounce of herb to 1 quart of water and allow to steep for 2 hours. Drink a cup to up to a quart a day depending on severity.
• Garlic, onions, oatstraw, calendula, motherwort, can also be consumed. Please consult an herbalist for guidance on their use.
• Kelp. Kelp can be added to soups or taken in a tea form.
• Deficiencies in essential fatty acids may make the varicose veins worse. Take 500 mg. of one of the following oils once each day: evening primrose, flaxseed oil, black currant oil, or borage oil.

REFERENCES:

Romm, Aviva Jill. The Natural Pregnancy Book: herbs, nutrition, and other holistic choices (2003) Celestial Arts

Lowdermilk, Dietra Leonard and Shannon E. Perry. Maternity and Women’s Health Care, 9th ed. (2007) Mosby.

Prenatal Vitamins

PRENATAL VITAMINS

2013-03-combo[The image to the left is not an endorsement of the brand, but illustrative of a typical type of package prenatal vitamins may come in]

There is an ongoing argument about the use of vitamin supplementation whether you are pregnant or not. I would say weigh out the pros and cons of the argument.

From my nutrition studies, I learned that even when we eat very well, our bodies will often not absorb all the nutrients within the food. The cause of this can be the natural digestive make-up of the body or a particular health issue we may have. This would hold true, even if we were to eat the best of natural and organic foods.

Unfortunately, most of the American populous chose to eat lousy diets. We also do not exercise properly, nor drink enough plain old water. But, during pregnancy it is important to make sure you eat well, and that your diet is full of pure natural and organic foods.

Even with a great diet, supplementation may be a wise choice. Doctors will recommend a prenatal vitamin supplement, so be sure it contains the nutrients you need.

Look for a prenatal vitamin that includes :

• 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid.
• 400 IU of vitamin D.
• 200 to 300 milligrams (mg) of calcium.
• 70 mg of vitamin C.
• 3 mg of thiamine.
• 2 mg of riboflavin.
• 20 mg of niacin.
• 6 mcg of vitamin B12.
• 10 mg of vitamin E.
• 15 mg of zinc.
• 17 mg of iron.

“Keep in mind that it is possible to jeopardize your baby’s (or your own) health by taking inappropriate amounts of synthetic vitamins, so be sure your health care provider is aware of any supplements you are taking (American Pregnancy. Org).” Notice this quote discusses “synthetic vitamins”? I would recommend prenatal vitamins that are sourced from natural or organic nutrients, not a synthetic vitamin.

As with herbs containing multiple nutrients and constituents within its structure, a range of nutrients comprise the whole of the vitamin you glean from food. The same could be said of a natural or organic nutrient used in the production of a multi-vitamin.

Be sure your diet is balanced and contains the nutrients you need for good health. See my hand-outs on nutrition for the information about a healthy diet during pregnancy. “Getting your nutrients from food is generally the best route. Foods contain other compounds your body needs — such as fiber — that supplements don’t provide.

You shouldn’t use a supplement to correct a poor diet, but rather to supplement a good one (Pari-Keener)” I would liken this concept to building a house. If built on a good foundation (proper whole foods diet) an addition built onto the house, will stand a long time (supplemental vitamins/Prenatal vitamin intake = healthier baby).

Some women may experience nausea, irritated stomachs, and constipation from prenatal vitamin use. If the vitamins are taken properly, and you are eating a good diet, the effects will be greatly reduced.

Prenatal Vitamin Warnings

• Tell your doctor about unusual or allergic reactions you have had to any medications, especially to any vitamin, mineral, or iron products.
• Be sure to tell your doctor if you have ever had bone disease, liver disease, kidney disease, or stomach ulcers.
• Because prenatal vitamins may mask the symptoms of pernicious anemia, they should be used only under a doctor’s supervision.
from How Stuff Works

REFERENCES:

Consumers Guide, Eds. Prenatal Vitamins. How Stuff Works. http://health.howstuffworks.com
/wellness/food-nutrition/vitamin-supplements/define-prenatal-vitamins.htm

Maria Pari-Keener, MS, RD. (n.d.) Prenatal Vitamins Best from Food or Supplements. http://www.parents.com/pregnancy/my-body/prenatal-vitamins/

Pregnancy and Prenatal Vitamins. WebMD. http://www.webmd.com/baby/guide/prenatal-vitamins (2012). Reviewed by Trina Pagano, MD. 5-29-14

Prenatal Vitamins. American Pregnancy Association. http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyhealth/prenatalvitamins.html

Water Birth – Part 2

THE USE OF WATER FOR LABOR

Water Birth Tub-from"Birth Pool in a Box"

Water Birth Tub-from”Birth Pool in a Box”

Some suggestions for labor:

• The temperature should be body temperature
or slightly lower.
• Be equipped with an efficient pump, heater, and
a thermostat.
• A thermometer and large plastic strainer to
clear the water.
• At least 2 feet deep, to cover the abdomen when
she is doing squats or is kneeling. In order to
encourage the “freestyle movement” it should
be a pool that is at least 5 ½ feet wide.
• Optimum time: during active labor (5-8
centimeters in dilation).
• When having back labor, get into the water. The water relaxes and acts as a counter-pressure.
• If you have previously had an active labor and then stalls once in the water, get out of the pool
and move: squat, kneel. Walk, sway hips.
• Or if the labor is stalled, get into the pool, sometimes it’s just the relaxation you need to get
things started again.

It is safe to use the pool once your membranes have ruptured. Birthing centers with experience using the pool have not had any increase in infections reported.

Don’t expect all pain sensation to cease. It will decrease the pain, but does not make it completely go away. Often it’s how you move in the water, not just the pool of water.

An advantage of using the water pool for labor in the hospital is that you can really feel a sense of privacy, allowing space to sink into your own intuitive self for labor. Anxiety and blood pressure both are lowered when in the water. The stressors of hospital atmosphere is diminished, lowering the catecholamine (stress hormones) and “the secretion of endorphins” which are the relaxants that you body naturally produces, and the hormones that produce pain relief.

WATER FOR BIRTHING

Water birth is perfectly safe.

Sears & Sears state “The school of water-birthing that practices slow emergence (baby is left under the water, SIC) can be dangerous (156).” They use the example of water mammals that birth in the water, and how these mammals assist the newly born immediately to the surface.

An additional need when doing a water birth, is some salt. Adding salt allows for the pool water to have the same salinity as the amniotic fluid of the womb. The amount necessary is a generous tablespoon of salt. Before filling the pool be sure it is cleaned with mild disinfectant, and rinsed, “unless disposable liners are provided to contain the water (Balaskas, 208)”.

If your membranes break while in the water, there is no need to change the water. The amniotic fluids and “bloody show” are both sterile.

During birth in the water, the relaxation of the sphincter muscles may cause some fecal matter to be excreted. This is when that suggested plastic strainer comes in handy. There is no “evidence to show that it contaminates the water sufficiently to contribute any risk of infection (Balaskas, 212)”
You can kneel on all fours, squat, or be in a semi-sitting position to birth. Your partner can be in the pool with you or sitting just outside the pool.

Once the baby is born, the attendant (doctor or midwife) check to be sure the cord is not around the baby’s neck, and unravel the cord if it is. The baby may float to the surface on its own, or you may gently guide the baby to the surface.

Breathing will not occur until the baby emerges to the air, the coolness of the air causing the reaction to breathe. Occasionally the baby may need suctioning to clear the air passages. The cord has not been cut yet, so there are dual sources of oxygen. “In the rare circumstance that the baby doesn’t breathe, it is wise to take baby gently out of the pool into a cooler atmosphere. This will trigger the breathing reflex (Balaskas, 214)”. If necessary oxygen can be administered.

The baby can be held in the water, at breast level. It is best to sit or kneel in a vertical position. The rooting reflex will be strong, so turn the baby to face you, yours and baby’s bellies facing, to make breastfeeding easier.

You can stay safely in the water until the placenta is expelled, which generally takes place 10 -20 minutes later. Pay attention to the cord, if the pulse decreases it means the placenta is about to be expelled. The baby can be handed to the partner, and you can stand up slowly and leave the pool. If the expulsion occurs sooner and you feel the placenta released from the body, you can still stand up slowly once you have realized it, the cord can be cut before leaving the pool.

The persons you have present to assist the birth can cover you and baby as you leave the pool. It would be important at this time to have the temperature raised in the room. If you had not expelled the placenta before leaving the pool, you can stand or squat at this juncture to deliver the placenta. Then sit upright and enjoy your baby with comfortable warm coverings.

At this point, the midwife or doctor will check both you and the baby. After their examination, you can go to your bed and “…relax with your baby tucked warmly beside you (Balaskas, 215),…”.

 

REFERENCES

Balaskas,Janet. Active Birth: the new approach to giving birth naturally, Rev. (1992) The Harvard Common Press
Sears, William and Martha Sears. The Birth Book: everything you need to know to have a safe and satisfying birth. (1994) Little, Brown and Company.

Water Birth – Part 1

WATER BIRTH

Water Birth Tub-from"Birth Pool in a Box"

Water Birth Tub-from”Birth Pool in a Box”

In the 1960s Russia began using the Water Birth technique, and Michel Odent (a French Obstetrician) studied its use to benefit the process of birthing in the seventies and eighties. Odent shared what was discovered in the book Birth Reborn. Until the 1990s, the United States still did not use the method even though it had gained world-wide respectability.

WHY IT WORKS

Water relieves pain during labor because of “the law of buoyancy” also known as Archimedes principle. It says that when an object is placed in water, it will displace a volume of water in equivalence to its own weight.

A pregnant women feels an almost weightlessness when she is in the water which supports muscles and bones. This allows for the uterus to spare its energy. As the muscles of the abdomen, thighs and back relax…so will the birth passage.

More depth the mother has in the pool, the greater effect of weightlessness. This is especially good for back labor. As the muscles of the back relax, the internal tissues will also. It then will allow baby to maneuver, especially if positioned in the posterior direction.

Stress and anxiety causes the release of the stress hormones, which may not be the best idea for both baby and mother during labor. Stress hormones in the effort to protect will move the blood from non-vital areas of the body, which includes the uterus (considered by the natural hormonal reactions as a non-vital organ). Without the full flow of blood the uterus, the baby becomes oxygen deprived.

Water also “tricks the pain sensing system (Sears & Sears,153).” When the body of the pregnant woman is immersed it acts like a continuing body massage, and the temperature and touch-sensitive nerve receptors of the skin are stimulated. This process floods the nervous system with “pleasant sensations, virtually gridlocking the gate to painful stimuli (Ibid.)”.

WHAT THE RESEARCH SHOWS

In The Birth Book, Sears & Sears state that from 1985 to 1995 about 18,800 women used a Jacuzzi like pool at a birthing center in Upland, California. Dr. Rosenthal, the director and obstetrician stated that the women had almost always experienced shorter / easier labors, and had 1/3 the cesarean section than hospitals.

Other benefits experienced:

• Another birthing center used water birth for VBAC and had 87.5 success rate.
• Mothers labeled “high risk” because of high blood pressure which had reduced dramatically within a few moments after submersing in the pool.

Optimal Fetal Positioning

OPTIMAL FETAL POSITIONING

anterior posterior

The Anterior Position is the optimal position for birth. The head of the fetus is more round. When entering the birth canal, the crown of the head presents first, molding to the birth canal and opening more readily.

With a Posterior Position, the head is more oval. Unlike the presentation of just the crown of the fetus, the baby’s head is not as moldable. The head will have more difficulty moving into and through the birth canal.

If the baby is in the Posterior Position, see if your support person can assist you to move the baby into LEFT Occiput position by using the Rebozo, forward leaning inversion (discussed in another handout), or have a Chiropractor do a pelvic adjustment (Jamie Zenner, specializes in this area).

The ROT (Right Occiput Transverse) position is a common position the fetus would be lying prior to the onset of labor. During birth, the fetus is most likely to rotate to Posterior Position rather than Anterior Position. The chin is usually flexed upwards, presenting first (See D, below).

Cranial Flexion

With LOP (Left Occiput Posterior) position the fetus’ back is lying opposite the mother’s liver. This position may allow the fetus to flex or curl his/her back, to tuck the chin. This would allow for an easier birth.

fetal position in relationship to the pelvis

The illustration above shows the various acronyms for the lie of a fetus, where the face of the fetus is turned towards. This will assist you in understanding what your doctor is telling you about the position of the fetus in your womb.Nearly half of the babies start out as breech babies, but turn on their own at around 34 weeks. 3 to 4 % still remain breech in presentation.

Doctors can do a maneuver to turn the baby called External Inversion. 60% of the babies will turn, but some revert back to breech presentation. Doing this maneuver may cause a premature birth.

There things that a pregnant woman can do for a breech baby without the external inversion:

  1.  Use an ironing board lain against the couch and lie with head towards the ground
    i. Be sure to use cushioning for the body, and a pillow for the head
    ii. Do this 3X a day for 20 minutes
  2. Another way is to lean forward, on your knees, butt up/head down resting on arms
    i. Do for 10 minutes, 3X a day.
    ii. Think of it ( and mentally “couch” your baby) as the position you would like to have your baby in birth
  3. Do not do either of these exercises if baby is head down, and posterior (without consulting your labor support person).

    Do not do either of these exercises if baby is head down, and posterior (without consulting your labor support person).

    If after reaching 37 weeks and these techniques have failed, try:

    1. Chiropractic Webster Maneuver with pubic symphysis aligning (see: Resource Page or class hand-out for local chiropractors)
    2. Craniosacral Therapy and Myofascial Release

How To Have a Normal Vaginal Birth

HOW TO HAVE A NORMAL VAGINAL BIRTH

baby-loading-tshirtEat Well During Pregnancy (See the post: Pregnancy Diet or Teen Pregnancy & Nutrition)

Exercise Regularly During Pregnancy (See up-coming post: Exercise during pregnancy)

Seek out the company of Other Women:

• A woman in labor needs other women or a woman to give support
• This was the old traditional way with Lakota women, as well as many other cultures!
• We learn about giving birth and about breastfeeding when in the company of other women.

Stay Home During Early Labor:

  • Early labor is not “true” labor.
  • It is what assists the thinning of the cervix in preparation for labor
  • Often it starts and stops
  • This is when you should rest
  • Your body is getting you ready for birth
  • Look at the length of the contraction itself, not the distance between each one. This will be your true indicator.
  • When you sense the early signs of excitement and nervousness, you are not ready
  • When you are concentrating and seriously working with your contractions is the second sign, but you are still not ready.
  • It is when you have been in the emotional space of the last sign, and feel aggravated when made to move…now you are getting into “real” labor.

This is IMPORTANT:

Turn your FOCUS INWARD and TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS!

  • Think comfort: Use pillows to cradle your body when resting
  • Dr. Odent states that the warm baths assists in the highest level of relaxation
  • Use soft music
  • Lower the lighting in the room
  • Walk, Rock or Sway, Dance, Squat, kneel and rock (especially for back labor)
  • There is no need to RUSH to the hospital!Final Stage / Delivery

    • Upright positioning is best for delivery of a baby. It uses gravity to assist the baby in birth.
    • If you cannot do an upright position, see if you can use a squat or kneeling position (have someone assist you)
    • Trust your body
    • See POSTS for pain management if you need to.

 

Non-Professional Labor Support

NON-PROFESSIONAL LABOR SUPPORT

father in delivery room

 

 

 

 


By the baby’s Father or Partner of the woman:

• Can speak for her, to interpret her needs and desires to the staff.
• Assurances, relaxation, encourage her to drink and eat snacks.
• Assistance in walking during labor, assist in getting in and out of the shower or birth tub, etc.
• If knowledgeable, help with breathing and focus in the 2nd stage of labor

Note: to work effectively, the father needs to be well informed. He needs to know what to expect. If he gets panicky he should leave the room to regain composure and then re-enter. First-time fathers especially need to be informed and may still have need of assurance. This can be assisted by his attendance at the Childbirth Education classes.

By a female relative (Grandmother, mother, aunt or sister):

• [At the hospital] Can speak for her, interpret her needs and desires to the staff.
• If they have experienced a natural birth, their assurances are “gold”. They will know what and when to do things to support the process.  If not, they need to become informed about natural childbirth.
• Assurances, relaxation, encourage her to drink and eat snacks.
• They can assist in labor as well, by walking with and supporting the laboring mother; assist her getting into and out of the shower or birth tub, etc.
• Can help with breathing and focus in the 2nd stage of labor.

RECOMMENDED POSTS To READ:

Let Your Monkey Do It
Overdue Pregnancy


FUTURE POSTS YOU WILL NEED TO READ:

Hospital VS. Midwifery Model of Care
Pain in Childbirth
Normal Vaginal Birth
Optimal Fetal Positions
Positions for Labor
Water Birth
Premature Rupture of Membranes
Fetal Distress
C-Section
VBAC