Optimal Fetal Positioning

OPTIMAL FETAL POSITIONING

anterior posterior

The Anterior Position is the optimal position for birth. The head of the fetus is more round. When entering the birth canal, the crown of the head presents first, molding to the birth canal and opening more readily.

With a Posterior Position, the head is more oval. Unlike the presentation of just the crown of the fetus, the baby’s head is not as moldable. The head will have more difficulty moving into and through the birth canal.

If the baby is in the Posterior Position, see if your support person can assist you to move the baby into LEFT Occiput position by using the Rebozo, forward leaning inversion (discussed in another handout), or have a Chiropractor do a pelvic adjustment (Jamie Zenner, specializes in this area).

The ROT (Right Occiput Transverse) position is a common position the fetus would be lying prior to the onset of labor. During birth, the fetus is most likely to rotate to Posterior Position rather than Anterior Position. The chin is usually flexed upwards, presenting first (See D, below).

Cranial Flexion

With LOP (Left Occiput Posterior) position the fetus’ back is lying opposite the mother’s liver. This position may allow the fetus to flex or curl his/her back, to tuck the chin. This would allow for an easier birth.

fetal position in relationship to the pelvis

The illustration above shows the various acronyms for the lie of a fetus, where the face of the fetus is turned towards. This will assist you in understanding what your doctor is telling you about the position of the fetus in your womb.Nearly half of the babies start out as breech babies, but turn on their own at around 34 weeks. 3 to 4 % still remain breech in presentation.

Doctors can do a maneuver to turn the baby called External Inversion. 60% of the babies will turn, but some revert back to breech presentation. Doing this maneuver may cause a premature birth.

There things that a pregnant woman can do for a breech baby without the external inversion:

  1.  Use an ironing board lain against the couch and lie with head towards the ground
    i. Be sure to use cushioning for the body, and a pillow for the head
    ii. Do this 3X a day for 20 minutes
  2. Another way is to lean forward, on your knees, butt up/head down resting on arms
    i. Do for 10 minutes, 3X a day.
    ii. Think of it ( and mentally “couch” your baby) as the position you would like to have your baby in birth
  3. Do not do either of these exercises if baby is head down, and posterior (without consulting your labor support person).

    Do not do either of these exercises if baby is head down, and posterior (without consulting your labor support person).

    If after reaching 37 weeks and these techniques have failed, try:

    1. Chiropractic Webster Maneuver with pubic symphysis aligning (see: Resource Page or class hand-out for local chiropractors)
    2. Craniosacral Therapy and Myofascial Release

ProfessionalLaborSupport-Part2

mom and babyChildbirth Educator

The childbirth educator teaches and assists women in understanding the nature of childbirth, from pre-conception through the first year of baby’s life.  The information they give assists women in having a better and safer birth experience.

The professional Childbirth Educator trained at Birth Arts International adheres to the “Midwifery Model” of care, as outlined by MANA. This is where I am training (and near completion of).

Here are some things that may be covered:

  • Nutrition – preparation to conceive, during pregnancy, and post-partum
  • Pre-natal tests: What is required and why
  • Exercise: for optimal health, and to tone muscles in preparation for birth, as well as post-partum exercises
  • Stages of labor
  • Interventions
  • C-sections and VBAC
  • Neonatal care (newborn baby care)
  • Breastfeeding

Even second-time mommies can benefit from classes.  It helps you to have a better / safer birth to review information.

Childbirth Educators can assist in labor, in a much similar way that a Doula would.  They can answer your questions and assist after the baby is born.

 Part 3: Midwifery

Beginnings

Trust the Process

Hoksiyuhab Oti:

“The house for giving birth (having babies)”. It is my goal to develop a free-standing birthing center on the Rosebud Reservation. I also wish to have a converted bus to travel around to the various communities on the reservation and bring birth support to the individual women on the reservation.

Childbirth Education

This is a source site for information about infertility/fertility issues, preparation for pregnancy,  healthy pregnancies, a safe childbirth, and Post-Partum care, and breastfeeding. The Rosebud Tribal Education has its own services for educating woman on the reservation for Parenting Classes. These two are separate and yet linked groups of topics.

Here you will also find support for those who wish to assist women and teens in pregnancy, links to information about childbirth, and a portal for online short-course Childbirth Education, for those who cannot afford/have no insurance for a class or have no transportation.  There will also be a page of links for information online.

Childbirth is a normal process.

Long before doctors took charge, women were helping women to give birth.

These women were called midwives.