A Good Question

What needs to happen, in order to fix a broken system? Your probably wondering what I mean by a broken system. I am talking about the care of women, and especially birthing.

In a nation that has been considered “advanced” we are so far behind the eight-ball that it becomes shameful. Our c-Section rates were seriously through-the-roof, and although some improvement has been made still higher than most “civilized” countries! The average being around 31%.

Along  with that outrageous number of c-Sections are the ever-climbing mortality rates of women in birth, predominately women of color. This is shameful in a country that is supposed to be “advanced”!

On top of both high c-Section rates, and high mortality rates for birthing, is the across-the-racial-board birth trauma. It should NEVER happen! But, we have nurses and doctors who force women into procedures, who intimidate and threaten.

The media makes it seem that birth is both dangerous and extremely painful. When that consciousness is embedded in the psyche of women, and you have a medical field that relies on mechanical means to monitor births… the stage is set. We have normalized bad birthing practices, and outdated concepts about birth.

That is without discussing the current political scenarios.

The next few blogs will address the history behind, and the current information about birthing in the United States. The outdated concepts surrounding birth practices need debunking. The normalization of bad birthing practices needs to have a light shown upon it, in order to make it STOP.

It is time to become educated,

get angry,

and create a change!

My sister site will also be publishing this information, although later, at joyousbirth

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How to “Trust the Process” in Childbirth

Trust the Process

Trusting is a big word. We oftentimes say we trust others, but do not even trust our own selves. The nurturance of our babies and bonding that would be necessary in utero, assists in developing a trust between baby and mother. But before working on the baby-mother bond learn to trust your own instincts.

Science has determined that the mother-baby bond is essential after a child is born. But what about the significance of bonding while the baby is growing inside the uterus? This is the essential missing information not communicated to women in our modern times.

Due to the obsession of the over-technological world we live in, we forget to listen within. We tend to not realize important knowledge lies inside our psyches. We avoid listening to our bodies. The cues are there, we just do not stop to listen.

The pregnant body is communicating what it needs all the time, and, believe it or not, the unborn baby is, too. All we have to do as mothers is learn to listen, give ourselves permission to trust the connection, and take the time to respond (Peters & Wilson, 22).

For survival, the baby must begin to adapt to its environment while in the womb in order to survive. There are special molecules that act as messengers, to allow the mother to communicate to her baby in utero. Components such as hormones and neuro-peptides cross the placental wall, sending information to the fetus.

Emotional intelligence is taught to the fetus via this mechanism. So he or she learns the whole range of emotions via the mother. Her responses teach the fetus. She sets the tone, so-to-speak for coping within the world.

Creating the bond with the fetus is a spiritual act that transcends the normal functions of mothering. How one adjusts to life, begins during the prenatal period.

Researchers and clinicians have found that prenatal and birth experiences of the mother, effect the birthing patterns she has with her own babies. These would include cultural patterns imbedded in the lives of the family. We can prevent “life-constricting patterns (McCarty, 9)” that are developed while in utero by addressing these issues and healing our own birth traumas.

This scientific approach closely parallels the work of John Upledger in his ground-breaking work with Cranio-Sacral and Somato-Emotional Release therapies. His theory is that the body stores memories at the cellular level.

Have you ever massaged someone, or been massaged, and a small soft-tissue lump is discovered that almost feels like it “crackles”? That is a “energy cyst”. When released it creates an emotional response, and the muscular tension abates. It is thought this “cyst” holds the memory of the injury. In Unpledger’s book, he states that traumatic injury can be fully healed by the release of these “cysts”.

I have come to look upon this phenomenon as ‘tissue memory’. By this I mean that the cells and tissues of the body may actually possess their own memory capabilities. These tissue memories are not necessarily reliant upon the brain for their existence [[Upledger, 64].

I would consider this muscular and tissue intelligence. If Upledger’s theory is true [and is likely, due to hundreds of patients having experienced his work] then it is an important aspect to consider for the mother and the mother-baby bond.

There are four essential KEYS to developing the mother-baby bond, and learning to be aware of and trust your own instincts.

Being: an awareness of thoughts and feelings
Observing: a state of mindfulness
Nourishing: involves all the things women do to tend to their emotional and physical needs.
Deciding: to make an active participation in creating your own reality. A conscious agreement
to make decisions based on deep inner-listening.

Steps to making the conscious agreement are:

1. Separating ourselves from all external influences (even for a few moments in the day)

2. Get quiet and pause. A few deep breaths in order to connect to your “source”

3. Listen. What is your gut saying to you? How does your body feel? How is your body reacting? How does your baby react to what you are feeling, physically or emotionally?

4. Then decide and commit. This is when you honor your feeling and that of your baby. Make a decision that will be in harmony with the messages your intuition says.

Through this practice, then you will develop a trusting respect for your own intuitive thought process, allowing it to guide you. You have several months of your pregnancy to find your awareness of self and of your baby.

When the day comes for labor to begin you take this newly-developed self-awareness, the bond you created between you and baby, and the education you have gained about safe birthing practices to trust fully the process of labor! “Listen” to your own self, and what your baby is telling you.

Relax into labor, BE with it. OBSERVE what is transpiring within your own body, and NOURISHING your emotional / physical needs while you are in labor. Then DECIDE. Decide to trust your instincts, trust your body (which is wonderfully made!), and to trust your bond you’ve made with your baby…

COMMIT to Trusting the Process.

REFERENCES:

McCarty, Wendy Anne. Ph.D. , R.N. The Call to Reawaken and Deepen Our Communication with Babies: What Babies Are Teaching Us. International Doula. Summer 2004, Vol 12.

Tracey Wilson Peters, CCCE, C.L.D., and Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CCCE. The Mission Piece: Consciousness and the MotherBaby Bond. Pathways to Family Wellness. Issue 31, Fall 2011

Upledger, John E., D.O., O.M.M. Your Inner Physician and You. 2nd Ed. North Atlantic Books. 1997

Midwife Model of Care VS Hospital Model – Part 2

doula at work

Conclusions

The Medical model of care has been dominant for a century in the northern century. “By the 1920s the United States and Canada became the first societies in human history to do away with midwifery (186)”, only to learn decades later that women still wanted midwives and some would reinvent midwifery if necessary.

In the United States – our present times, only 10% of the babies delivered are born with the assistance of midwives. Whereas, in Western Europe and the rest of the world midwives attend the majority of the births. These nations have the lowest rates of maternal and newborn deaths.

There are some variances within the models of care. Some doctors now will practice according to the midwifery model of care. Some midwives, are employed by large hospital practices where the technological-medical model of care is the rule. They use the midwives for those women who desire midwifery care but the midwives in the medical model are pressured to work in the technological-medical model of care.
This information was taken from Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth. Ina May is an internationally known Midwife, who has delivered babies and written books on Midwifery and natural childbirth. She works at THE FARM, in Tennessee.

Midwife Model of Care VS Hospital Model – Part 1

doula at work

The Midwifery Model of Care

This ancient form of birthing care approaches the idea of birth as more holistic way of care-giving, recognizing the female power of creation. It also acknowledges the holistic view with a seamless unity of mind, body, and spirit; that mother and baby are inseparable units, birth is a normal healthy process.

Visits are much longer. The Midwife is attentive to the pregnant woman, answering her questions. Care-giving, education, counseling are all a part of the Midwife Model of care.

Nutrition is emphasized as the means for a healthy pregnancy, good birth, and strong thriving babies. Companionship during labor is considered important to minimize the use of technology to intervene in the process of birth.

The Midwifery Model has not time-constraint on the process of birth. Labor has its on rhythm, “…it can start and then stop, speed up or slow down and still be normal (Gaskin, 184)”. Midwives give continuous assistance throughout the duration of labor and delivery, and postpartum support after the baby is born. Women can move freely and eat freely throughout the process of labor.

Medical Hospital Model of Care

A product of the industrial revolution, and male derived, its basis is technology and medicine. It is assumed that the body is machine-like, full of short-comings or defects (some has stated child-birth as “pathological”). Pregnancy and labor are viewed as an illness, and that to prevent harm to the mother and baby, must be treated with drugs and/or medical equipment. Also, birth MUST take place within 24 hours.

Mind and body are separate entities. Women are consigned to the bed in a supine position, hooked up to electronic fetal monitors, intravenous tubes, and blood-pressure machines. Eating and drinking, after a certain point in the labor process, are not allowed. Analgesia is administered to ease labor pains since the Medical Model of Care deems pain as unacceptable.

Office visits during pregnancy are short, and questions are discouraged. The mother must take the back seat in her concerns during pregnancy, and passive role during labor. Women are treated homogeneously, with individuality considered unimportant.

ProfessionalLaborSupport-Part2

mom and babyChildbirth Educator

The childbirth educator teaches and assists women in understanding the nature of childbirth, from pre-conception through the first year of baby’s life.  The information they give assists women in having a better and safer birth experience.

The professional Childbirth Educator trained at Birth Arts International adheres to the “Midwifery Model” of care, as outlined by MANA. This is where I am training (and near completion of).

Here are some things that may be covered:

  • Nutrition – preparation to conceive, during pregnancy, and post-partum
  • Pre-natal tests: What is required and why
  • Exercise: for optimal health, and to tone muscles in preparation for birth, as well as post-partum exercises
  • Stages of labor
  • Interventions
  • C-sections and VBAC
  • Neonatal care (newborn baby care)
  • Breastfeeding

Even second-time mommies can benefit from classes.  It helps you to have a better / safer birth to review information.

Childbirth Educators can assist in labor, in a much similar way that a Doula would.  They can answer your questions and assist after the baby is born.

 Part 3: Midwifery

ProfessionalLaborSupport-Pt 1

PROFESSIONAL LABOR SUPPORT

On the average during an 8 hour shift a nurse will spend about 15 minutes offering physical comfort measures, provide emotional support, or advocate for her patients. Nursing staff are criticized during their reviews for spending too much time with patients if they DO take more time with laboring mothers.

Odds are better with a midwife. But often hospital based midwives have time constraints. You are going to do best with the support of a professional such as a Monitrice or Doula.

doula at work DOULAS

There are two different types of Doulas. A Labor Doula, who will be with you through the pregnancy, meeting with you several times, supporting you while you are in labor (if you so choose), and the first few hours after the baby is born.

There is a Post-Partum Doula, that will work with you and baby for a period of time after the baby is born.

Doulas do not “catch” babies. They will support you in labor and through delivery if you choose to have a Doula.

TheBirthDoula

It has been documented that with the support of a BIRTH (Labor) Doula:

• Lessens problems with babies born in poor condition, babies are less often admitted into special-care nurseries, the hospital stay is shorter in duration, nor are they likely to have infections.
• Women are shown to have less pain and anxiety during labor, cope better with labor, less likely to have lowered numbers of episiotomies, the use of IV Pitocin is lowered, the use of instruments during delivery is lowered and best of all: C-section rates are lower. The length of the labor is shorter.
• Breastfeeding past the 6 week mark is higher when a Doula is utilized for support.
• Also women who have had Doula support have more positive feelings towards the new baby, a better relationship with the father, and lowered postpartum depression.

A BIRTH DOULA:

• Can accompany you when you go to the doctor the first time.
• Visit with you a few times during pregnancy to:
o Assess your nutritional needs and help you stay healthy through your pregnancy.
o Assist you with good posture and exercises that will keep you strong and help in having an easier delivery.
o Before the time of labor and delivery, discuss your options and help you write up a Birth Plan.
• During labor: assist with pain measures, advocate in your behalf with hospital staff (when necessary), help coach your labor partner during labor, etc.
• Afterwards, will assist you in breastfeeding and baby care (first couple hours after delivery).
• Make a visit Post-Partum to see how you are doing, and assist where necessary.
• Do not “catch” the baby.


POST PARTUM DOULA
:

Generally, they offer some or all of the following:

• Breastfeeding Support
• Mother Care Support
• Cooking meals
• Shopping
• Cleaning
• Caring for infant while mother bathes, eats, etc..
Some also offer:
• Other childcare (not directly caring for newborn)
• Laundry

NEXT WEEK: The Childbirth Educator