Protein Foods

Protein Foods

(with the protein foods containing the most essential amino acids first).

Proteins
Eggs (preferably organic, or at least “free-range”)
Milk
Fish (preferably:
Poultry (preferably: baked, broiled or stewed)
Tofu & other beans
Oats (preferably not quick cooking)
Nuts (especially almonds)
wheat
cornmeal

Protein Food Combinations

(to assure best usage of the most Amino Acids found in the food /Proteins )

Beans + Wheat
Beans + Rice
Corn bread + Beans
Corn tortillas + Beans
Lentil Curry + Rice
Pea Soup + Wheat (bread)
Pasta + milk and/or Cheese
Cheese + Wheat (cheese sandwiches)
Macaroni + Cheese
Garbanzo dip (hummus)
Sunflower seeds, peanuts, roasted soybeans (snack foods)

_______
“Diet for a Small Planet”. Fig.14, page 176
Ibid. page 181 (Chart)

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Stress

About Stress

stress

There are two types: the type that is good, making you feel satisfaction and happiness. And there is negative, which leads to fatigue and possibly, illness.

There is no singular thing to point to as a cause of the latter. But, what is known about it is that the body makes biochemical changes when it is present.

GAS or General Adaptation Syndrome, has three stages. These stages are: alarm, resistance, and exhaustion. In the alarm stage the quick initial response is lowered blood pressure and tachycardia. This is in preparation for the fight or flight response to continued stress. The body will continue to increase its production of adrenocortico-tropic hormones. Along with this is increasing heart rate and elevation in blood pressure.

If the condition becomes prolonged, to the point where the adaptation of the body is too great, vulnerability of the body occurs…and exhaustion. The body is not designed to stay in a heightened state of arousal.

If continued, the sympathetic nervous system becomes activated with vasoconstricted blood vessels, increasing blood pressure, increasing heart rate, and the secretion of adrenaline. The immune system will then become suppressed and the increasing cortisol will cause cholesterol and other lipids in the blood to increase at the same time.

Situations or “agents” that cause stress are called STRESSORS. These may include physical things such as heat, exertion, trauma, infection, or cold. Or it may be from psychological reasons such as fear, anxiety, or disappointment. Stress may be caused by external things. Examples may include poverty, inadequate housing, and certain life events.

Factors altering stress responses are called mediators. The MEDIATORS may be genetics, developmental factors, experience, and social context. Some people appear to be more resilient and cope better with stress, while others seem to be more vulnerable.

Women with Disabilities -The Healthcare Team- Part 2

Interviewing the Doctor

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Here are some questions you may wish to ask:

What are the pros and cons of pregnancy for me?

If the doctor is opposed, ask why?

What do you know about my disability, and what access do you have regarding it?

Do you have experience with the pregnancy and delivery of babies with disabled women? How much?

In what way will you be working with my regular doctor?

If there are unusual symptoms that arise, who should I call if I am not sure if those symptoms are pregnancy or disability related?

How will labor and delivery be affected by my disability?

Will there be a need for treatments that differ from the usual types, due to my disability, and how will we get the cooperation of the hospital for those treatments?

Do you think I may need a caesarian section? Why? Would you set a date, or wait for labor to begin spontaneously?

Can I get a referral for genetic counseling?

The physical exam

Besides the questions suggested previously, the examination is also another time to decide on the doctor who will tend to your care. How the doctor behaves during the examination and time taken to let you know what he/she is doing in that exam will assist in your final decision.

Does the doctor ask you questions during the exam? Are you treated with sensitivety and consideration? Are the questions the doctor is asking relative to your level of sensation, mobility, and flexibility? Regarding your comfort?

The doctor’s partners

If the doctor has partners or a physician that they use when they are not available, you will need to schedule an appointment with them on one of your regular visits, as early as possible. See if they also are “on board” and will be responsive to your needs and care.

You will need to feel comfortable with any one of these doctors, in case they are the one in delivery with you. It would be much more comfortable to have a familiar face, and know if they also will support your needs.

The Vision

CHAIR STRADDLE

It has been my long-term goal, to start the work of Childbirth Education on the Rosebud Reservation, then expand the birthwork to local native women assisting families and extended family in childbirth.  This vision includes a mobile bus that would be able to reach even the most rural of communities to assist in health care for pregnant and post-partum women, and a free-standing childbirth center.  BIG dreams!

Today, I was thinking “What are the obstacles for young women who may be interested in becoming a Doula?” Well, first it would be the funding necessary to have the training as a Doula. So I set-up a scholarship funding campaign on Go Fund Me.

The campaign is designed to raise money for a minimum of 10 women. I believe that is a good start!  If you are interested in supporting my vision, here is my campaign: https://www.gofundme.com/rstdoulas

How to “Trust the Process” in Childbirth

Trust the Process

Trusting is a big word. We oftentimes say we trust others, but do not even trust our own selves. The nurturance of our babies and bonding that would be necessary in utero, assists in developing a trust between baby and mother. But before working on the baby-mother bond learn to trust your own instincts.

Science has determined that the mother-baby bond is essential after a child is born. But what about the significance of bonding while the baby is growing inside the uterus? This is the essential missing information not communicated to women in our modern times.

Due to the obsession of the over-technological world we live in, we forget to listen within. We tend to not realize important knowledge lies inside our psyches. We avoid listening to our bodies. The cues are there, we just do not stop to listen.

The pregnant body is communicating what it needs all the time, and, believe it or not, the unborn baby is, too. All we have to do as mothers is learn to listen, give ourselves permission to trust the connection, and take the time to respond (Peters & Wilson, 22).

For survival, the baby must begin to adapt to its environment while in the womb in order to survive. There are special molecules that act as messengers, to allow the mother to communicate to her baby in utero. Components such as hormones and neuro-peptides cross the placental wall, sending information to the fetus.

Emotional intelligence is taught to the fetus via this mechanism. So he or she learns the whole range of emotions via the mother. Her responses teach the fetus. She sets the tone, so-to-speak for coping within the world.

Creating the bond with the fetus is a spiritual act that transcends the normal functions of mothering. How one adjusts to life, begins during the prenatal period.

Researchers and clinicians have found that prenatal and birth experiences of the mother, effect the birthing patterns she has with her own babies. These would include cultural patterns imbedded in the lives of the family. We can prevent “life-constricting patterns (McCarty, 9)” that are developed while in utero by addressing these issues and healing our own birth traumas.

This scientific approach closely parallels the work of John Upledger in his ground-breaking work with Cranio-Sacral and Somato-Emotional Release therapies. His theory is that the body stores memories at the cellular level.

Have you ever massaged someone, or been massaged, and a small soft-tissue lump is discovered that almost feels like it “crackles”? That is a “energy cyst”. When released it creates an emotional response, and the muscular tension abates. It is thought this “cyst” holds the memory of the injury. In Unpledger’s book, he states that traumatic injury can be fully healed by the release of these “cysts”.

I have come to look upon this phenomenon as ‘tissue memory’. By this I mean that the cells and tissues of the body may actually possess their own memory capabilities. These tissue memories are not necessarily reliant upon the brain for their existence [[Upledger, 64].

I would consider this muscular and tissue intelligence. If Upledger’s theory is true [and is likely, due to hundreds of patients having experienced his work] then it is an important aspect to consider for the mother and the mother-baby bond.

There are four essential KEYS to developing the mother-baby bond, and learning to be aware of and trust your own instincts.

Being: an awareness of thoughts and feelings
Observing: a state of mindfulness
Nourishing: involves all the things women do to tend to their emotional and physical needs.
Deciding: to make an active participation in creating your own reality. A conscious agreement
to make decisions based on deep inner-listening.

Steps to making the conscious agreement are:

1. Separating ourselves from all external influences (even for a few moments in the day)

2. Get quiet and pause. A few deep breaths in order to connect to your “source”

3. Listen. What is your gut saying to you? How does your body feel? How is your body reacting? How does your baby react to what you are feeling, physically or emotionally?

4. Then decide and commit. This is when you honor your feeling and that of your baby. Make a decision that will be in harmony with the messages your intuition says.

Through this practice, then you will develop a trusting respect for your own intuitive thought process, allowing it to guide you. You have several months of your pregnancy to find your awareness of self and of your baby.

When the day comes for labor to begin you take this newly-developed self-awareness, the bond you created between you and baby, and the education you have gained about safe birthing practices to trust fully the process of labor! “Listen” to your own self, and what your baby is telling you.

Relax into labor, BE with it. OBSERVE what is transpiring within your own body, and NOURISHING your emotional / physical needs while you are in labor. Then DECIDE. Decide to trust your instincts, trust your body (which is wonderfully made!), and to trust your bond you’ve made with your baby…

COMMIT to Trusting the Process.

REFERENCES:

McCarty, Wendy Anne. Ph.D. , R.N. The Call to Reawaken and Deepen Our Communication with Babies: What Babies Are Teaching Us. International Doula. Summer 2004, Vol 12.

Tracey Wilson Peters, CCCE, C.L.D., and Laurel Wilson, IBCLC, CCCE. The Mission Piece: Consciousness and the MotherBaby Bond. Pathways to Family Wellness. Issue 31, Fall 2011

Upledger, John E., D.O., O.M.M. Your Inner Physician and You. 2nd Ed. North Atlantic Books. 1997

Body Mechanics – 2

BODY MECHANICS

As your pregnancy advances, your body ligaments and joints will naturally loosen to allow for an easier birth, by allowing the pelvis to develop flexibility. The following suggestions will assist you in avoiding strain while doing the normal daily activities.

Stand Smart

To reduce ankle swelling and assist your circulation, avoid standing for long periods of time. In order to avoid circulation issues, periodically flex your calves and /or rotate the foot in circular motions. You should also alternate resting one foot then the other, on a stool.

Lift lightly

stooping lifting carryingYou already are carrying around and lifting more weight. Don’t lift heavy objects. For light lifting, use your arm, leg, and thigh muscles not your back. Don’t bend to get close to an object, squat. Keep that head of yours up and with your back straight. Lift by pushing up with your legs and flexing your arms. Avoid the urge to lift up a toddler, use the squat to get down to the child’s eye-level or sit on the floor to cuddle.

Sit Sensibly

sittingAvoid sitting for more than a half an hour at a time. Use straight-back chairs with a small pillow at the small of the back. Use a footstool, shift positions often, and avoid crossing your legs. Periodically exercise your calf muscles and do foot flexions and / or rotations.

When arising from the chair, avoid lunging forward. Slide your body to the edge of the chair, plant your feet on the floor, and use the leg muscles to lift yourself up. If someone is willingly offering assistance to get up, use it.

Sleep

During the final four to five months, side-lying is the best position. This is the best for baby and the most comfortable for you.

In the last trimester you should have at least four pillows. Two pillows should be under the head and at least one for the top leg to rest upon, and maybe one to support your lower back. Shift slightly forward towards the belly, to get the full weight off the lower leg.

Rise in the Proper Manner

Don’t sit up suddenly when the alarm goes off because it will strain your lower back and abdominal muscles. Don’t immediately swing your legs off the bed, as it would strain your lower back ligaments. Instead, roll onto your side and push yourself up by using your arms, into a sitting position then swing your legs gently over the side.

Body Mechanics- I

START WITH GOOD POSTURE

As the baby grows in the womb, your center of gravity will shift. The additional weight in the front could create a swayback posture, causing discomfort on the lower back. The following suggestions to assess and alter your body mechanics will assist in having less discomfort.

STANDING POSTURE

Head

Keep your head up. Looking down all the time will throw off your balance. Of course, you will want to look at the new bulge as it grows but doing so all the time will make your posture off balance.
Keep your chin level. When your head is held correctly, the shoulders will follow as well as the back.

Drop your Shoulders

Allow the shoulders to rest in a natural position. To do this relax the shoulders. If you tend to wear your shoulders up around your ears or slouched forward, your whole body will be off balance.
Try to avoid “throwing back” your shoulder blades. This will cause back problems. You may need to have someone massage the shoulders to allow them to relax into the correct position.

Avoid Tensing / Swaying the Lower Back

As your baby grows the weight will cause your back muscles to contract as a counter-balance of the shift in weight to the front. The tension of the muscles contracting may cause a backache.
A slight curvature of the back is normal. Avoid an exaggerated curve as it will cause a “swayback”. If there was chronic pain of the back before you were pregnant, it will only get worse from pregnancy. You may need to get Chiropractic attention if you already tended toward a “swayback” before pregnancy or if you had back issues prior.

Tilt your Pelvis Forward

Pull your abdominal muscles in, tuck in your buttock muscles, and tilt the pelvis forward. Doing this will counteract tendency of the lower back to arch abnormally.

Relax the Knees

Bend your knees slightly. Avoid locking them.

Exercise for Pregnancy Health

Throughout the pregnancy year (pre-natal through post-partum) the woman’s body is in physiologic adaptation. Pregnancy is not an excuse to become sedentary, rather a time to “amp up” the exercise program. Exercise increases cardiac output, increases oxygen consumption, and changes the blood-flow distribution.

Doing a good exercise routine will not only assist the body in adapting to pregnancy, but assist in labor preparation. Your body’s muscular / skeletal structure changes in pregnancy. To have the ability, strength, and fortitude for birth a woman should do stretches, walking, squats, and other routines of exercise.

Doing these will also prevent many of the problems of pregnancy. Some of these would include:

• Calf cramping
• Tight back muscles with back fatigue and pain.
• Swelling of the ankles
• Pressure on the bladder
• Finger tingling or numbness
• Discomfort of the upper back due to breast size changes
• Spasms in the groin
• Itching due to stretched skin
• Tightening of the hip flexors (muscle group)
• Pressure and hyper-extended knees
• Sway or hollow back

There are some women who should not be doing exercise, especially rigorous exercise, during pregnancy. Also, each pregnancy should be assessed individually. Consult with your healthcare provider before you start an exercise program. If you had regularly exercised prior to pregnancy it would still be wise to talk to your healthcare provider.

For the childbirth education course, exercises that are included may differ greatly than a full-on prenatal exercise program (unless the instructor is certified in the latter. In a childbirth education coursework, the exercises emphasized are those that would prepare for delivery, reduction of third-quarter pregnancy discomforts, and enhanced post-partum recovery. These are not intended as the sole exercise done by a pregnant woman but as an addition to the physical activity already being done by the pregnant woman.

The first portion would address posture. Good posture is important not only for standing, but also sitting (whether in a car, or at the computer). After posture would be the Pelvic-rock, Squatting, and abdominal Strengthening; along with several stretching exercises for the legs, buttocks and arms.

Recommended recreational exercises would include:

Walking (varying the pace each time), running, cycling, and dancing (especially belly dancing).

Prenatal Vitamins

PRENATAL VITAMINS

2013-03-combo[The image to the left is not an endorsement of the brand, but illustrative of a typical type of package prenatal vitamins may come in]

There is an ongoing argument about the use of vitamin supplementation whether you are pregnant or not. I would say weigh out the pros and cons of the argument.

From my nutrition studies, I learned that even when we eat very well, our bodies will often not absorb all the nutrients within the food. The cause of this can be the natural digestive make-up of the body or a particular health issue we may have. This would hold true, even if we were to eat the best of natural and organic foods.

Unfortunately, most of the American populous chose to eat lousy diets. We also do not exercise properly, nor drink enough plain old water. But, during pregnancy it is important to make sure you eat well, and that your diet is full of pure natural and organic foods.

Even with a great diet, supplementation may be a wise choice. Doctors will recommend a prenatal vitamin supplement, so be sure it contains the nutrients you need.

Look for a prenatal vitamin that includes :

• 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid.
• 400 IU of vitamin D.
• 200 to 300 milligrams (mg) of calcium.
• 70 mg of vitamin C.
• 3 mg of thiamine.
• 2 mg of riboflavin.
• 20 mg of niacin.
• 6 mcg of vitamin B12.
• 10 mg of vitamin E.
• 15 mg of zinc.
• 17 mg of iron.

“Keep in mind that it is possible to jeopardize your baby’s (or your own) health by taking inappropriate amounts of synthetic vitamins, so be sure your health care provider is aware of any supplements you are taking (American Pregnancy. Org).” Notice this quote discusses “synthetic vitamins”? I would recommend prenatal vitamins that are sourced from natural or organic nutrients, not a synthetic vitamin.

As with herbs containing multiple nutrients and constituents within its structure, a range of nutrients comprise the whole of the vitamin you glean from food. The same could be said of a natural or organic nutrient used in the production of a multi-vitamin.

Be sure your diet is balanced and contains the nutrients you need for good health. See my hand-outs on nutrition for the information about a healthy diet during pregnancy. “Getting your nutrients from food is generally the best route. Foods contain other compounds your body needs — such as fiber — that supplements don’t provide.

You shouldn’t use a supplement to correct a poor diet, but rather to supplement a good one (Pari-Keener)” I would liken this concept to building a house. If built on a good foundation (proper whole foods diet) an addition built onto the house, will stand a long time (supplemental vitamins/Prenatal vitamin intake = healthier baby).

Some women may experience nausea, irritated stomachs, and constipation from prenatal vitamin use. If the vitamins are taken properly, and you are eating a good diet, the effects will be greatly reduced.

Prenatal Vitamin Warnings

• Tell your doctor about unusual or allergic reactions you have had to any medications, especially to any vitamin, mineral, or iron products.
• Be sure to tell your doctor if you have ever had bone disease, liver disease, kidney disease, or stomach ulcers.
• Because prenatal vitamins may mask the symptoms of pernicious anemia, they should be used only under a doctor’s supervision.
from How Stuff Works

REFERENCES:

Consumers Guide, Eds. Prenatal Vitamins. How Stuff Works. http://health.howstuffworks.com
/wellness/food-nutrition/vitamin-supplements/define-prenatal-vitamins.htm

Maria Pari-Keener, MS, RD. (n.d.) Prenatal Vitamins Best from Food or Supplements. http://www.parents.com/pregnancy/my-body/prenatal-vitamins/

Pregnancy and Prenatal Vitamins. WebMD. http://www.webmd.com/baby/guide/prenatal-vitamins (2012). Reviewed by Trina Pagano, MD. 5-29-14

Prenatal Vitamins. American Pregnancy Association. http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyhealth/prenatalvitamins.html

ProfessionalLaborSupport-Pt 1

PROFESSIONAL LABOR SUPPORT

On the average during an 8 hour shift a nurse will spend about 15 minutes offering physical comfort measures, provide emotional support, or advocate for her patients. Nursing staff are criticized during their reviews for spending too much time with patients if they DO take more time with laboring mothers.

Odds are better with a midwife. But often hospital based midwives have time constraints. You are going to do best with the support of a professional such as a Monitrice or Doula.

doula at work DOULAS

There are two different types of Doulas. A Labor Doula, who will be with you through the pregnancy, meeting with you several times, supporting you while you are in labor (if you so choose), and the first few hours after the baby is born.

There is a Post-Partum Doula, that will work with you and baby for a period of time after the baby is born.

Doulas do not “catch” babies. They will support you in labor and through delivery if you choose to have a Doula.

TheBirthDoula

It has been documented that with the support of a BIRTH (Labor) Doula:

• Lessens problems with babies born in poor condition, babies are less often admitted into special-care nurseries, the hospital stay is shorter in duration, nor are they likely to have infections.
• Women are shown to have less pain and anxiety during labor, cope better with labor, less likely to have lowered numbers of episiotomies, the use of IV Pitocin is lowered, the use of instruments during delivery is lowered and best of all: C-section rates are lower. The length of the labor is shorter.
• Breastfeeding past the 6 week mark is higher when a Doula is utilized for support.
• Also women who have had Doula support have more positive feelings towards the new baby, a better relationship with the father, and lowered postpartum depression.

A BIRTH DOULA:

• Can accompany you when you go to the doctor the first time.
• Visit with you a few times during pregnancy to:
o Assess your nutritional needs and help you stay healthy through your pregnancy.
o Assist you with good posture and exercises that will keep you strong and help in having an easier delivery.
o Before the time of labor and delivery, discuss your options and help you write up a Birth Plan.
• During labor: assist with pain measures, advocate in your behalf with hospital staff (when necessary), help coach your labor partner during labor, etc.
• Afterwards, will assist you in breastfeeding and baby care (first couple hours after delivery).
• Make a visit Post-Partum to see how you are doing, and assist where necessary.
• Do not “catch” the baby.


POST PARTUM DOULA
:

Generally, they offer some or all of the following:

• Breastfeeding Support
• Mother Care Support
• Cooking meals
• Shopping
• Cleaning
• Caring for infant while mother bathes, eats, etc..
Some also offer:
• Other childcare (not directly caring for newborn)
• Laundry

NEXT WEEK: The Childbirth Educator