Body Mechanics – 2

BODY MECHANICS

As your pregnancy advances, your body ligaments and joints will naturally loosen to allow for an easier birth, by allowing the pelvis to develop flexibility. The following suggestions will assist you in avoiding strain while doing the normal daily activities.

Stand Smart

To reduce ankle swelling and assist your circulation, avoid standing for long periods of time. In order to avoid circulation issues, periodically flex your calves and /or rotate the foot in circular motions. You should also alternate resting one foot then the other, on a stool.

Lift lightly

stooping lifting carryingYou already are carrying around and lifting more weight. Don’t lift heavy objects. For light lifting, use your arm, leg, and thigh muscles not your back. Don’t bend to get close to an object, squat. Keep that head of yours up and with your back straight. Lift by pushing up with your legs and flexing your arms. Avoid the urge to lift up a toddler, use the squat to get down to the child’s eye-level or sit on the floor to cuddle.

Sit Sensibly

sittingAvoid sitting for more than a half an hour at a time. Use straight-back chairs with a small pillow at the small of the back. Use a footstool, shift positions often, and avoid crossing your legs. Periodically exercise your calf muscles and do foot flexions and / or rotations.

When arising from the chair, avoid lunging forward. Slide your body to the edge of the chair, plant your feet on the floor, and use the leg muscles to lift yourself up. If someone is willingly offering assistance to get up, use it.

Sleep

During the final four to five months, side-lying is the best position. This is the best for baby and the most comfortable for you.

In the last trimester you should have at least four pillows. Two pillows should be under the head and at least one for the top leg to rest upon, and maybe one to support your lower back. Shift slightly forward towards the belly, to get the full weight off the lower leg.

Rise in the Proper Manner

Don’t sit up suddenly when the alarm goes off because it will strain your lower back and abdominal muscles. Don’t immediately swing your legs off the bed, as it would strain your lower back ligaments. Instead, roll onto your side and push yourself up by using your arms, into a sitting position then swing your legs gently over the side.

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Positions for Labor-Part 2

POSITIONS FOR LABOR – PART 2

Variations of the Squat

The Supported Squat

birthing• Your partner sits or squats behind you, toboggan-like style with back against the wall or bed, or using a chair for support
• Or your partner can be in front, doing a squat, and hold your hands for balance.
Standing Supported Squat
• As you relax down into the squat, take the weight off your feet and melt into the arms and against the body of your partner.
• In this position your body will tell your mind to relax
• You then surrender your mind and body to your labor
Dangle Support Squat
• Your partner supports from behind, or two people supporting you (one on each side) helping in supporting you in the squat position.

Kneeling

image004This position is a natural extension of the squat position when the labor is too intense.

• Kneel on the floor with a pillow
• Lean against a chair
• Or get on all fours
o especially good for back labor
o to try and turn a posterior positioned baby
o or if your labor is accelerating and seems unmanageable.

Kneel-Squat Position

• Kneel with one knee while squatting with the other leg.
• Alternate between legs, or you can do a rocking and swaying motion.
Knee-Chest Position
• Your knees are on the floor, while your head and arms are on a pillow
o Slows overly intense contractions
o Counteracts an urge to push when your cervix is not fully ripened.

Sitting

CHAIR STRADDLE• Sit straddled over a low stool, toilet seat, chair or birthing bed angled like a seat
• The best of these is the sit-squat over a low stool, for the same reasons as the plain old squat position

 

Side-Lying

SIDE-LYING• Does NOT use GRAVITY in the same manner as the SQUAT.
• Best on the left side, to prevent the uterus from compressing major blood vessels that run along the right side of the backbone
• It provides a way to labor without pressure of the uterus on the back, and allows for some sleep in a long labor.
• Use pillows for your head, and pillows under the knee of the right leg, and support pillows behind your back.
o It allows you to quickly roll into the kneel or up into a squat
o Once the contraction is done you can roll back into your nest of pillows.

 

*Images from The Birth Book, Sears & Sears (1994) and internet birthing images/stock photos*

REFERENCES:

Balaskas, Janet. Active Birth: the new approach to giving birth naturally, rev. (1992) Harvard Common Press.

Dick-Read, Grantly. Childbirth Without Fear: principles and practice of natural childbirth, 2nd ed. (2013) Pinter & Marition.

Sears, William and Martha Sears. The Birth Book: everything you need to know to have a safe and satisfying birth. (1994) Little, Brown and Company.